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Thread: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

  1. #28
    Olympic Champ r.payton@att.net's Avatar
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    Default Re: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

    We had a lot of thunder and lightening yet only a 1/4 in of rain -the above picture is of a small creek.
    You know, I think I would rather be a man than a god . We don't need anyone to believe in us. We just keep going anyhow. It's what we do.

  2. #29

    Default Re: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

    Well you lucked out. We got 3 inches a few days ago, 1 inch yesterday and I'm not sure how much this morning but it wasn't as much as the other two days. Now, just as I have feared, I have to mow grass. But, the rivers are up so that's a plus for kayaking.

  3. #30

    Default Re: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

    Quote Originally Posted by quinn14 View Post
    Hmm...for some reason I thought you were originally from the Cleveland area.
    Family currently in Twinsburg, Richmond Heights, and Chagrin Falls. More relatives in the Cleveland area than anywhere else in the U.S. My next trip back is probably 10 or 11 months from now.

  4. #31

    Default Re: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

    Quote Originally Posted by Flop The Nuts View Post
    More relatives in the Cleveland area than anywhere else in the U.S.
    I'm sorry to hear that.

  5. #32
    Olympic Champ r.payton@att.net's Avatar
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    Default Re: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

    Tourists are flocking to the remnants of an Indiana town uncovered by the summer's drought.
    It's called Monument City -- or at least it used to be, anyway. Located about two hours northeast of Indianapolis near Wabash, the small town was submerged after the construction of the Salamonie Reservoir in 1967.
    Justin Harrington, a wildlife specialist at the Department of Natural Resources, said the drought has revealed the foundations of some houses and an old school.
    "Now it's dry, and it's easiest for people to walk there," he said. "They can experience things they've heard from their parents or grandparents."
    Harrington said the town had a population of about 50 to 100 people. It was evacuated when the reservoir was built.
    Harrington said the DNR is getting dozens of calls a day about the town. People are allowed to walk down there and take pictures, but he said taking anything is strictly prohibited.
    Assistant reservoir manager Wayne Ley said people have been visiting what used to be Monument City and have found artifacts.
    "They've found old door knobs, different things you could find around a house, maybe a coin or two," Ley told Lafayette television station WLFI.
    "Normally, this is under several feet of water," he said.
    Graves located in area cemeteries were moved elsewhere, he said, but some unmarked graves were washed away and are now being discovered in strange places.
    "Usually bones are found by fishermen who are fishing along the shore, and they'll look down and they'll see some bones," Ley said.
    Boaters using the reservoir are being warned to use caution because old house foundations, roads and other parts of the underwater towns not completely visible could present an unseen danger.
    "I've worked here 34 years, and this has never happened before," Ley said.
    The town might stay uncovered for some time. The latest U.S. Seasonal Drought Outlook report, released by the National Weather Service on Thursday, indicated drought conditions will likely continue.
    The Associated Press contributed to this report.
    You know, I think I would rather be a man than a god . We don't need anyone to believe in us. We just keep going anyhow. It's what we do.

  6. #33
    Olympic Champ r.payton@att.net's Avatar
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    Default Re: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

    The warmest month recorded in Indianapolis history is over. If you think July's combination of blistering heat and scant rainfall made Central Indiana feel like a desert wasteland, there's a reason.
    It was.
    Based on weather statistics, Indianapolis felt a lot like Page, Ariz.
    The small town, about five hours north of Phoenix in the heart of "Canyon Country," had a daily average temperature of about 84.6 degrees in July.
    It saw about an inch of rain, with even less in June.
    Sound familiar?
    Indianapolis' average temperature in July hovered around 84 degrees, the highest on record.
    Slightly more than 0.8 of an inch of rain fell in Indianapolis last month. The month before set a record for being the city's driest June ever recorded, with 0.09 of an inch of rain.
    But Page has a climate-based excuse for why it's so hot and dry. The low rainfall amounts are because of a rain shadow, or dry area, on the southern Arizona mountains that blocks moisture from the Pacific Ocean from reaching the town.
    In Indiana, the dry spell is not a climate issue so much as a weather pattern issue. There just is not enough moisture coming in from the Gulf of Mexico to provide the area with the 41/2 inches of rain it needed last month to measure up to the average.
    Most Central Indiana residents are all too aware of how hot it has been. Twenty-eight days last month hit a high of at least 90 degrees -- two more than enough to beat a record that stood for 111 years.
    But some know that more than others. The members of the Cardinal Ritter High School marching band have been practicing all summer for at least four major band competitions, including the upcoming Band Day at the Indiana State Fair on Friday.
    Band director Eddie Guanajuato has been leading the kids at Cardinal Ritter for nine years. While he said they have experienced fewer days with temperatures in excess of 100 degrees this year than last year, the summer sun is still brutal.
    "They're some tough kids," he said. "And I've had some help with this. Parents were able to get Gatorade, ice, water, towels. And I took the time to make sure that they were properly hydrated, got inside."
    Guanajuato said the team has been avoiding some of the heat by doing more "mental work" inside, such as reviewing routines before hitting the field.
    Keeping the routines indoors was probably a good idea. In July there were seven days with temperatures that hit at least 100 degrees. The only month with more on record was July 1936, which had nine days.
    Although temperatures last month might have been bad, the state has seen worse. This July fell 10 days short of the record for most 95-degree days with 21. That record also was set back in 1936.
    Even though July is over, the dog days of summer could persist.
    "It looks like August is at least going to be starting out pretty warm," said John Hendrickson, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service's Indianapolis bureau.
    It's about as expected. On average, August is the second-hottest month of the year for Indianapolis after July.

    the other 3 days below 90 were 88 ,89 86. Driving home last night it was 82 at 9:30 pm.
    You know, I think I would rather be a man than a god . We don't need anyone to believe in us. We just keep going anyhow. It's what we do.

  7. #34
    Olympic Champ r.payton@att.net's Avatar
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    Default Re: Indianapolis ties record for dry spell

    YES . Finally raining here . Over an inch as of 6 a.m. and still raining .
    You know, I think I would rather be a man than a god . We don't need anyone to believe in us. We just keep going anyhow. It's what we do.

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