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Thread: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

  1. #10

    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    If the dollars are not spent in Europe they will be spent elsewhere. Money circulates throughout the global economy with very little regard to borders.

    My lunch break is over now. Time to be productive. I will pick this up later Big.

  2. #11

    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    Quote Originally Posted by hardcore View Post
    If the dollars are not spent in Europe they will be spent elsewhere. Money circulates throughout the global economy with very little regard to borders.

    My lunch break is over now. Time to be productive. I will pick this up later Big.
    Man, you eat an early lunch!

  3. #12

    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    Don't forget the Chinese who also have a big role in the U.S. dollar. But I can't blame the Chinese and Saudis. I am placing some of the blame on reckless fiscal policy on the part of our government. We have been spending money hand-over-fist creating massive yearly deficits, ridiculous cumulative debt (sum of deficits), and future promises to Medicare and Social Security that can not possibly be covered under any reasonable economic scenario. U.S. monetary policy (previously bow-tie Greenspan and currently Bernanke) with their growth at all costs is wreaking havoc with rampant sector inflation in the areas that matter to people the most.

    Alternative energy sounds great right now with $129 oil and $4 gas. We're 2-bad days away on the market from $4 gas. Unfortunately, none of the alternatives seem to be economically viable 'yet'. If they were viable, I'm just guessing they would've been here already.

    We clearly have geniuses dictating U.S. energy policy too!

    Quote Originally Posted by Big View Post
    Saudi Araia artificially keeps the dollar afloat by accepting mainly dollars for oil.

    What happens when that stops? I suppose the dollar plummets because America simply doesn't make enough goods for export to keep the dollar strong without Saudis.

    10 million barrels per day is 3.65 billion of barrels per year at $125 per barrel. That's half a trillion $$$ in export America would have to make up.

  4. #13

    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    Alternative will become more and more economically viable if gas prices continue to grow. It takes time for that sort of thing to be devloped and for infrastructure to be put in place for it.

    If the Saudis were smart they'd ramp up production and get prices down to $3 or so and let everyone forget about finding alternatives/more efficient ways of consumption and then let prices gradually increase back up to $4+ per gallon without anyone noticing.
    There's no such thing as a pretty good aligator wrestler.

  5. #14

    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    Quote Originally Posted by FloggingSully View Post
    Alternative will become more and more economically viable if gas prices continue to grow. It takes time for that sort of thing to be devloped and for infrastructure to be put in place for it.

    If the Saudis were smart they'd ramp up production and get prices down to $3 or so and let everyone forget about finding alternatives/more efficient ways of consumption and then let prices gradually increase back up to $4+ per gallon without anyone noticing.
    I think the Saudi's and the Iranians (and that nutcase in Venezuela) like the sound of President Barak Hussein Obama.

  6. #15

    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    Nissan/Renault recently announced they will be marketing an all-battery car in the United States by 2010. If I remember the story correctly, the Israelis requested the vehicle to be developed and Nissan/Renault came through. I believe it will be sold in Israel soon. The first iteration may not appeal in great numbers here, however, like anything else -- it will improve. In current form, it has an 80-mile limit and takes 5-hours to charge on 110 volts. Not bad as that would fit the bill for many commuters. As long as they can make it durable and affordable, I would definitely consider it for commuting and errands. Between football, basketball, and baseball (games and practices for kids), school activities (study groups, etc.), I'm going broke keeping 3 cars going.

    Quote Originally Posted by FloggingSully View Post
    Alternative will become more and more economically viable if gas prices continue to grow. It takes time for that sort of thing to be devloped and for infrastructure to be put in place for it.

    If the Saudis were smart they'd ramp up production and get prices down to $3 or so and let everyone forget about finding alternatives/more efficient ways of consumption and then let prices gradually increase back up to $4+ per gallon without anyone noticing.

  7. #16
    Olympic Champ therick's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    That's pretty cool. I remember my dad driving an all electric s-10 pickup truck 10 years ago as a company car for AEP. So, GM has had the technology for some time now. They'd just prefer to sit on it until forced to do something about it.

    That's the problem with American industry these days. Spend millions lobbying the government to keep things as they are and to buy up patents that they intend to sit on so that they don't have any competition. Then, when a Japanese or German company comes out with the product, they're behind the curve on developement and playing catch up. We used to lead the curve in technology, now we barely keep up.

  8. #17

    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    The math will have to work-out for people. Let's say your typical day is 50-miles in a Honda Accord. In pure city driving, you should be able to average 27 mpg assuming you don't gun it on $3.80 gas. 50 / 27 = 1.85 gallons x $3.80 = $7. (Wow -- the Accord is cheap to drive compared to the V-6 Nissan Quest that I drive. I swear I spend that much driving half the amount).

    I have absolutely no idea how many kilowatts it would take to motor a car around. Let's assume the Nissan/Renault motor is 10,000 watts or 10 kilowatts. Assuming 10 cents / kilowatt hour, it would take this much to charge it for 5-hours:

    10 kilowatts x (10 cents / kilowatt-hour) x 5-hours = 500 cents or $5 (Remember, this $5 would take you 80 miles whereas the $7 only gets you 50 miles in the Accord).

    So, the 2-big factors are what your area charges per kilowatt hour, and how big the Nissan/Renault motor is. I will research this as I am interested now. Fortunately, I only have to drive the Quest a few times a week since I ride-share. My wife gets the Accord who drives more.

    Quote Originally Posted by therick View Post
    That's pretty cool. I remember my dad driving an all electric s-10 pickup truck 10 years ago as a company car for AEP. So, GM has had the technology for some time now. They'd just prefer to sit on it until forced to do something about it.

    That's the problem with American industry these days. Spend millions lobbying the government to keep things as they are and to buy up patents that they intend to sit on so that they don't have any competition. Then, when a Japanese or German company comes out with the product, they're behind the curve on developement and playing catch up. We used to lead the curve in technology, now we barely keep up.

  9. #18
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    Default Re: Is America ready for alternative energy even if it becomes available?

    Nobody wants a piece of my original question I guess.

    Also, if everyone starts using electricity for cars, the price will go up I suppose.

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