Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 10 to 18 of 18

Thread: Superdelegates

  1. #10

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    a very interesting wikipedia entry:
    Robert Byrd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Still, I wish he had endorsed Obama before the W. Virginia Primary, when it might have meant something. Is he worried about his re-election??? He's 90!
    "All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind." -- Abraham Lincoln

  2. #11

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    Quote Originally Posted by ban basketball View Post
    Really? You've never been in on any of the discussions about the use of the "n" word and how if "they" get to use it, why am I racist if I use it?
    Guess not, issues such as what nouns black people use to refer to one another aren't really that important to me, or those I associate with.

    Quote Originally Posted by ban basketball View Post
    Maybe not so much on here, but it was a regular source of argument "over there."
    Maybe so, but we aren't there. I don't doubt that some people feel that way, but it was the use of the word "most" that kind of jumped out at me in your last post.
    RIP Jacob Schlottke - 1984-2011

    "If Cornell finishes ahead of Iowa with five all americans I'll jump into the Des Moines River after finals." -Herkey#1 8/16/12

  3. #12

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    Quote Originally Posted by JensenS View Post
    Guess not, issues such as what nouns black people use to refer to one another aren't really that important to me, or those I associate with.



    Maybe so, but we aren't there. I don't doubt that some people feel that way, but it was the use of the word "most" that kind of jumped out at me in your last post.
    Fair enough, but I am comfortable with the word "many."
    UNI Panthers...Because it's just right.

  4. #13

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    Quote Originally Posted by ban basketball View Post
    Yes, and Byrd is still openly using the "n" word. However, and amazingly, most on here wouldn't find that to be racist.
    This just highlights the hpocrisy of the left. They think that everyone is racist who wants to control our own borders regardless of race, but they think using the "n" word is OK as long as a liberal uses it.

    The whole superdelegate thing is messed up anyhow. The democrats think that the average citizens aren't smart enough to determine the party nominee, so they need elites to do it.

  5. #14

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    I read that the reason we have superdelegates in the deomcratic party is because party leaders weren't showing up at the convention. It wasn't that the people weren't smart enough or the leaders were elitists, it was just a way to try to enliven the convention. I hope it's done away with soon, but don't try to play it like that.
    Last edited by BonnieJ2; 05-15-2008 at 07:06 PM.
    "All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind." -- Abraham Lincoln

  6. #15

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    Quote Originally Posted by skipster View Post
    This just highlights the hpocrisy of the left. They think that everyone is racist who wants to control our own borders regardless of race, but they think using the "n" word is OK as long as a liberal uses it.

    The whole superdelegate thing is messed up anyhow. The democrats think that the average citizens aren't smart enough to determine the party nominee, so they need elites to do it.
    Rhetoric from another pissed off republican. Yawn..................

  7. #16

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    http://wvgazette.com/latest/200805190255
    Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., endorsed Barack Obama for president shortly after noon today, focusing on his hope to end the Iraq War.

    "As people all across this great nation know, I have been one of the most outspoken opponents of the Bush administration's misguided war in Iraq and its saber rattling around the globe," Byrd said.

    He said he had "no intention of involving myself in the Democratic campaign for President in the midst of West Virginia's primary election. But the stakes this November could not be higher."

    "Barack Obama is a noble-hearted patriot and humble Christian, and he has my full faith and support," Byrd concluded.
    "All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind." -- Abraham Lincoln

  8. #17

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    LOL....

    This reminds me of a comment Byrd made not too long ago justifying his ues of the "N word".

    "....there are black N...s and there are white N...s...."

  9. #18

    Default Re: Superdelegates

    This is from Politico.com. by Ben Smith
    Sen. Robert Byrd endorses Obama


    "The Charleston Gazette reports an endorsement deep with symbolism: West Virginia Senator Robert Byrd is endorsing Barack Obama.

    "Barack Obama is a noble-hearted patriot and humble Christian, and he has my full faith and support," Byrd says.

    He said he has "no intention of involving myself in the Democratic campaign for President in the midst of West Virginia's primary election. But the stakes this November could not be higher."

    Byrd, 91, a master of Senate rules and Iraq war foe, has spent much of his political career repenting the racism of his youth. He's acknolwedged having joined the Ku Klux Klan in 1942, and campaigned against civil rights legislation in the 1960s.

    In The Audacity of Hope, Obama wrote of meeting Byrd, and their joint awareness of the past; his endorsement is a note of reconciliation that underscores Obama's message.

    Obama wrote of meeting Byrd as new senator in one of his book's most compelling passages:

    Listening to Senator Byrd I felt with full force all the essential contradictions of me in this new place, with its marble busts, its arcane traditions, its memories and its ghosts. I pondered the fact that, according to his own autobiography, Senator Byrd had received his first taste of leadership in his early twenties, as a member of the Raleigh County Ku Klux Klan, an association that he had long disavowed, an error he attributed—no doubt correctly—to the time and place in which he'd been raised, but which continued to surface as an issue throughout his career. I thought about how he had joined other giants of the Senate, like J. William Fulbright of Arkansas and Richard Russell of Georgia, in Southern resistance to civil rights legislation. I wondered if this would matter to the liberals who now lionized Senator Byrd for his principled opposition to the Iraq War resolution—the MoveOn.org crowd, the heirs of the political counterculture the senator had spent much of his career disdaining.

    I wondered if it should matter. Senator Byrd's life—like most of ours—has been the struggle of warring impulses, a twining of darkness and light. And in that sense I realized that he really was a proper emblem for the Senate, whose rules and design reflect the grand compromise of America's founding: the bargain between Northern states and Southern states, the Senate's role as a guardian against the passions of the moment, a defender of minority rights and state sovereignty, but also a tool to protect the wealthy from the rabble, and assure slaveholders of noninterference with their peculiar institution. Stamped into the very fiber of the Senate, within its genetic code, was the same contest between power and principle that characterized America as a whole, a lasting expression of that great debate among a few brilliant, flawed men that had concluded with the creation of a form of government unique in its genius—yet blind to the whip and the chain."
    "All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind." -- Abraham Lincoln

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •