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Thread: Role of Race in PA Primary

  1. #1

    Default Role of Race in PA Primary

    6 of 10 white voters voted for Clinton
    9 0f 10 black voters voted for Obama

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap_campaignp...mary_exit_poll

    I give Obama credit for NOT making race an issue in this campaign.

    However, we have a ways to go until the average Joe looks at a man or woman and doesn't see the race. IMO.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    Agreed but at the very least we have come a long way in a very short time. If we keep the progress going then this to will just be a foot note in history one day.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    42 reads on 1 post.

    I think people are uncomfortable discussing race issues because they are afraid to be called a racist.

    (see Rev Wright thread for evidence)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    This - the margin of loss was greater than the polls - sort of thing has happened before. Though this time it was lessor in extent it happened in California and Virgina. Obama almost has to factor it in when there is a mostly non-African American electorate.
    I am 49, bald, ugly, and don't own a single cool thing. Kids like me though.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    Quote Originally Posted by Ground&Pound View Post
    42 reads on 1 post.

    I think people are uncomfortable discussing race issues because they are afraid to be called a racist.

    (see Rev Wright thread for evidence)
    Is it that, or are we more afraid to acknowledge our own prejudices? My experiences tell me the latter is the case.
    UNI Panthers...Because it's just right.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    Speaking for myself, I'm confident enough in my character to say I am not racist.

    However, I would feel uncomfortable discussing the fact that 9 of 10 black voters voted for Obama with my black co-workers.

    I would be afraid they would misinterpret what I say or question my character for even bring up such an issue.

    Reverse racism is a topic that white people have a real difficulty discussing with blacks. IMO.

    It's taboo. Even the media ignores it.

    I'd even go as far as to say that it causes resentment that leads to even more division amongst blacks and whites.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    Quote Originally Posted by Ground&Pound View Post
    Speaking for myself, I'm confident enough in my character to say I am not racist.
    "Racist" may not be the correct term, but using the word the word that I prefer-and the one you are likely referring to-prejudice, that would make you unusual.

    I've worked with race issues for quite a few years now and I'm not sure that I've ever met anyone that does not have some type of racial prejudice. The trick is coming to recognize what it is and where it lies.

    As for the "reverse racism," it's difficult for minority groups' "racism" to have much of an impact. This is because there isn't hundreds of years of history behind it that institutionally backed it and reinforced it. In addition, nor is there a power structure in society comprised of minorities that can keep it going. CEO's, politicians, local leaders, the courts, the police, etc, etc are still white males, and they can see to it that "minority racism" doesn't go very far.
    UNI Panthers...Because it's just right.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    Are saying white males control the way minorities vote?

    And, don't you argee that any form a racial predjudice divides our country?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Role of Race in PA Primary

    Quote Originally Posted by Ground&Pound View Post
    Are saying white males control the way minorities vote?

    And, don't you argee that any form a racial predjudice divides our country?

    As to the first question, yes and no. There's a reason why disenfranchised minorities have not traditionally had high voter turnout rates. When they don't see people that represent their interests election after election, they won't turn out. That's the "yes." The "no" is for obvious reasons.

    Racial prejudice always divides our country, yes. However, and as I said, some racial prejudice has no influence and no power base to back it and maintain it. It, consequently, doesn't go very far.
    UNI Panthers...Because it's just right.

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