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Thread: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

  1. #10
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    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    clone,

    Civilians in Iraq probably want Americans to leave but the freedom fighters might want to keep fighting.

    Chance,

    During Reagan administration many foreign fighters and some Afghans also attacked and killed civilians but they were called freedom fighters by the West and CIA helped them.

  2. #11
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    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    Afghanistan
    The best-known mujahideen, various loosely-aligned Afghan opposition groups, initially fought against the incumbent pro-Soviet Afghan government during the late 1970s. At the Afghan government's request, the Soviet Union became involved in the war. The mujahideen insurgency then fought against the Soviet and Afghan government troops during the Soviet war in Afghanistan. After the Soviet Union pulled out of the conflict in the late 1980s the mujahideen fought each other in the subsequent Afghan Civil War.

    The mujahideen were significantly financed and armed (and are alleged to have been trained) by the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) during the Carter and Reagan administrations and the governments of Saudi Arabia, the People's Republic of China, several European countries, Iran, and Zia-ul-Haq's military regime in Pakistan. The Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) was the interagent used in the majority of these activities to disguise the sources of support for the resistance.

    Ronald Reagan praised them as "freedom fighters", and three mainstream films, 1987 The Living Daylights, 1988 Rambo III and 2007 Charlie Wilson's War, portrayed them as heroic.

    Afghanistan's resistance movement was born in chaos and, at first, virtually all of its war was waged locally by regional warlords. As warfare became more sophisticated, outside support and regional coordination grew. Even so, the basic units of mujahideen organization and action continued to reflect the highly segmented nature of Afghan society.[2] Eventually, the seven main mujahideen parties allied themselves into the political bloc called Islamic Unity of Afghanistan Mujahideen.

    Many Muslims from other countries volunteered to assist various mujahideen groups in Afghanistan, and gained significant experience in guerrilla warfare. Some groups of these veterans have been significant factors in more recent conflicts in and around the Muslim world. A wealthy Saudi named Osama bin Laden was a prominent organizer and financier of an all Arab islamist group of foreign volunteers; his Maktab al-Khadamat funnelled money, arms, and Muslim fighters from around the muslim world into Afghanistan, with the assistance and support of the Saudi and Pakistani governments.[3] These foreign fighters became known as "Afghan Arabs" and their efforts were coordinated by Abdullah Yusuf Azzam.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mujahideen

  3. #12

    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    Big,

    I thought we were talking about Iraq. But since we are no going into Afghanistan so be it. In Afghanistan the Americans did back the fighters against the Soviets. But where in your previous post did it show or say that the fighters back by the US committed terrorist acts against the Afghanistan people. In addition the US never did back those who were associated with Bin Laden.

  4. #13
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    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    The Mujahideen leaders paid great attention to sabotage operations. The more common types of sabotage included damaging power lines, knocking out pipelines, radio stations, blowing up government office buildings, air terminals, hotels, cinemas, and so on. From 1985 through 1987, an average of over 600 terrorist acts a year were recorded. In the border region with Pakistan, the mujahideen would often launch 800 rockets per day. Between April 1985 and January 1987, they carried out over 23,500 shelling attacks on government targets. The mujahideen surveyed firing positions that they normally located near villages within the range of Soviet artillery posts, putting the villagers in danger of death from Soviet retaliation. The mujahideen used land mines heavily. Often, they would enlist the services of the local inhabitants and even children.

    They concentrated on both civilian and military targets, knocking out bridges, closing major roads, attacking convoys, disrupting the electric power system and industrial production, and attacking police stations and Soviet military installations and air bases. They assassinated government officials and PDPA members, and laid siege to small rural outposts. In March 1982, a bomb exploded at the Ministry of Education, damaging several buildings. In the same month, a widespread power failure darkened Kabul when a pylon on the transmission line from the Naghlu power station was blown up. In June 1982 a column of about 1,000 young party members sent out to work in the Panjshir valley were ambushed within 30 km of Kabul, with heavy loss of life. On 4 September 1985, insurgents shot down a domestic Bakhtar Airlines plane as it took off from Kandahar airport, killing all 52 people aboard.

    Mujahideen groups had three to five men in each. After they received their mission to kill certain government officials, they busied themselves with studying his pattern of life and its details and then selecting the method of fulfilling their established mission. They practiced shooting at automobiles, shooting out of automobiles, laying mines in government accommodation or houses, using poison, and rigging explosive charges in transport.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_war_in_Afghanistan

  5. #14

    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    Man big i love you, that is some funny stuff.

    Ofcourse Al Qaeda want America to stay in Iraq, the biggest blow would be to withdraw the troops. Having troops in Iraq give's Alqaeda the chance to kill Americans easily and to cost America lots of money hence financially hurting them.

    You kill on freedom fighter and two more will replace him, kill one terrorist (American soldier) and there will be a huge debate in American politics and lots of hrut feelings. The muslims are very tough and have iron will Americans are weak.

  6. #15
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    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by Big View Post
    clone,

    Civilians in Iraq probably want Americans to leave but the freedom fighters might want to keep fighting.
    Why? Because they hate our freedom and want to do us harm? They want us in Iraq so they can hurt us more (as well as the Iraqui people)? This is truly talk radio logic.

  7. #16
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    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    Quote Originally Posted by matclone View Post
    Why? Because they hate our freedom and want to do us harm? They want us in Iraq so they can hurt us more (as well as the Iraqui people)? This is truly talk radio logic.
    Because they know America wants them wiped out to make Middle East safe for oil extraction. It is much easier to fight America alone in Iraq than when its out of there and has the World behind it.

  8. #17
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    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    So, your comment tells me you believe they dislike/detest/hate America. People aren't born haters, they have to have a reason. I'd say those reasons are predominently built around our presence on their soil. If we remove our presence (militarily and otherwise), the top terrorists might be out of a job (but the hate industry is always looking for recruits; they could come to America and get on talk radio), but the movement would certainly lose its momentum.

  9. #18
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    Default Re: Looking at Iraq war from another perspective

    matclone,

    Will America give up its influence in the Middle East ever? In Israel? Towards Iran? In Lebanon? In Saudi Arabia, etc. That is why freedom fighters want to keep fighting in Iraq. They want to live their ancient way while America wants to teach them the new way.

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