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Thread: another drunken cop

  1. #1
    Olympic Champ r.payton@att.net's Avatar
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    Default another drunken cop

    GREENFIELD, Ind. -- A former Hancock County sheriff's deputy was sentenced Monday to a year in jail, with all but 14 days suspended, after he pleaded guilty to drunken driving.Michael Robinson, 35, was also ordered to perform 40 hours of community service work.Robinson, a 10-year veteran of the department, was arrested on Dec. 21 after his squad car and another vehicle crashed on slick roads.<table class="storyAd" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="storyAdObj"> <table style="width: 300px; height: 250px;" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr style="padding: 0px; margin: 0px; border-style: none; border-width: 0px;"><td style="padding: 0px; margin: 0px; border-style: none; border-width: 0px;">
    </td> </tr> </tbody></table> <noscript> </noscript> <noscript></noscript> <noscript></noscript> </td></tr></tbody></table>Authorities said the deputy's blood-alcohol level was 0.16, twice the legal limit.Robinson was on duty at the time of the crash. His car was totaled, but he was not seriously injured.
    seems DUI and crashed cruisers are reaching epidemic proportions in Indiana-SEE Post Lawyer seeks Dismissal -this guy was ON DUTY, drunk, and crashed his cruiser-OR rather the city's cruiser . He gets time served and 40 hours community service ?

  2. #2

    Default Re: another drunken cop

    A DUI crash with minor injuries seldom gets jail time at all - at least in California.
    Cops are held to a higher standard (as they should be). This also cost him his career. Please keep in mind that there are thousands and thousands of peace officers. Along with being peace officers, they are also human beings. It comes as no shock that some of them suffer from the same vices as the rest of the population. What is amazing is that there are so few that do.

    R.I.P. Cyrano and Roxanne.

  3. #3
    Olympic Champ r.payton@att.net's Avatar
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    Default Re: another drunken cop

    M.R.
    Indianapolis has had a recent rash of police involved beatings, DUI's ,Child molesting -maybe it is the drinking water. ??

  4. #4

    Default Re: another drunken cop

    ugh what's with these cops and drunk driving!

  5. #5

    Default Re: another drunken cop

    I worked alongside hundreds for cops who served valiantly and unselfishly each day. Over the years I lost several personal friends who were killed in the line of duty...you can't get more unselfish than that.

    Just for the record I also had to tow my beat partner's car because he was arrested for shoplifting on-duty. I had another teammate arrested for a much more serious crime. Both men lost their job as they should. Also, as a street supervisor I sent a guy home for being on-duty under the influence of prescription drugs. He entered rehab and was later terminated. By the way, he was a good personal friend with whom our families socialize together. He was on the fast track for promotion too and an outstanding cop. But he was also a person with human frailties.

    Cops are human just like every other profession. I read about male and female teachers arrested for unlawful sexual intercourse with minors; doctors who have been arrested for illegal prescription drug abuse or illegally prescribing them; judges and attorneys disbarred for ethic and legal violations, etc. A cop and other officials I've mentioned being arrested for DUI or other more serious offenses are still anomalies. It worthy of discussion but hardly the norm. Im glad he got caught. But the bottom line is, to critical thinkers, this officer's action does not reflect on the law enforcement profession at all. It reflects on the person arrested.

  6. #6

    Default Re: another drunken cop

    Thank you, PM, for saying (much better) what I was trying to get across. What makes those headlines stand out is that fact that it IS a police officer (or teacher, or minister, etc.) that is at the focus. You don't see "Walmart employee arrested for DUI" or "Bank teller charged with drug possession" headlines. It is when those in whom we have placed special trust fail that news is generated. It doesn't have to be large numbers - it is the importance given, particularly by the media, to the nature of the professional that attracts the attention.

    R.I.P. Cyrano and Roxanne.

  7. #7

    Default Re: another drunken cop

    How much would anybody like to bet that for every drunken, wife-abusing, child-molesting, grifting, pick-your-problem cop out there, you can find 10 like this guy - except that the newspapers aren't looking for these. They don't make the front page.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...0,839242.story

    Long Beach Police Officer David A. Garcia demonstrated his courage on one of his first days on the force.
    It was 1991, and Garcia was a probationary officer under the supervision of a field training officer.
    "Pull over the car!" Garcia told the older policeman during a patrol.
    When the cruiser stopped, Garcia jumped out and ran to an injured pigeon that was struggling at the side of the road. Placing the bird gently into a box, he directed the training officer to drive to a veterinarian's office.

    Other Long Beach police officers say that's the way Garcia was until the very end, when he succumbed to a long battle with cancer on Feb. 7.
    The 44-year-old officer would begin every night shift on the city's north side by unloading pet food from the back of his car and piling it into the trunk of his police vehicle.
    As he patrolled Long Beach's darkened avenues, Garcia watched for homeless people with dogs. If the street person's pet was hungry, Garcia would pull a few cans of dog food from the trunk and assure the owner there would be more if needed.
    "He'd stop and find out the dog's name and what kind of care it was getting. He paid for flea collars and for their dogs to go to groomers," said Officer Keith Mortensen, who worked with Garcia for 15 years.
    To the uninitiated, Garcia "was a no-nonsense, the-law-is-the-law guy," Mortensen said. "But he'd say, 'Animals need help.' He didn't want anything bad to happen to them."
    Garcia regularly left bowls of water and cat food for feral cats living in various city parks and in the police station parking lot. As a result, patrol cars always had tiny paw prints on them.
    "Working graveyard, you often find animals hit by cars in the dark. Dave would always make sure that animal control got there in a timely manner. If they were late, he'd get on the radio and tell them to hurry up," said Officer Mario Talavera, a friend for two decades.
    "One homeless man Dave befriended has a dog named Sasha, and occasionally he gets picked up because misdemeanor violations have gone to warrant. Dave wanted to make certain that Sasha was taken care of when his owner was in jail, so he arranged for a lady in a trailer park to take care of the dog on those occasions," Talavera said.
    "Dave bought a tag with the lady's name and phone number on it for Sasha. He would pay for her to take Sasha to the groomer's and pay her for her time and gas."

    Garcia regularly purchased sandwiches for homeless people and made a point of checking on an elderly Long Beach woman who walked her dog between midnight and 1 a.m. every night.
    Garcia was honored by Long Beach officials for helping rescue another elderly woman during a violent 1997 confrontation with her mentally ill grandson. Citizens frequently commended him for his professionalism, according to police administrators.

    But his fellow officers say they will remember him for more personal reasons.
    An avid sports fan — Garcia studied communications in college with an eye toward becoming a sportscaster — he often dazzled co-workers by reciting local football players' sports statistics.
    They say Garcia learned that a waitress at a sports bar frequented by off-duty officers during Sunday football games was battling cancer but had no insurance. So he regularly tipped her $80 or $100, explaining: "I know what she's going through. She needs all the help she can get."

    Despite inoperable tumors that by then were in his lungs, Garcia chased down and captured two automobile burglars involved in a cross-country crime spree that ended near the Virginia Country Club.
    Other days he worked despite painful blisters on his hands and feet that were caused by chemotherapy. In December he struggled to report for duty one final time so he could distribute Christmas gifts to senior citizens and homeless people he had befriended.
    Many of them are likely to be at a memorial service at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Long Beach's Bethany Lutheran Church, 4644 Clark Ave. They were notified of their friend's death when officers found their names and numbers in Garcia's cellphone.

    Garcia's survivors include his wife, Melissa; his 4-week-old daughter, Aydan; and his parents, Kathleen Fjermedal and Cayetano Garcia.
    Interment Wednesday will be private.

    bob.pool@latimes.com

    Copyright ? 2011, Los Angeles Times

    R.I.P. Cyrano and Roxanne.

  8. #8
    NCAA Champ WhippetGrappler's Avatar
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    Default Re: another drunken cop

    Nice story M Richardson. Thanks for sharing.
    BRUTUS BUCKEYE WILL TAKE YOU DOWN...

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