Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567
Results 55 to 62 of 62

Thread: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

  1. #55

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    The market is only a reflection of its players. Additionally, the market allows for different value judgments and allows everyone to freely puruse whatever he wants. If people want junk food, they can buy it. Your personal value judgment is that junk food is bad. Some people don't see it that way, or perhaps they agree its bad, but they still want it. That is where the whole freedom thing comes in. You are allowed to buy whatever you want, good or bad. The decision is yours alone.

    I don't think that big business manipulates the public with food prices. If they arbitrarily set prices for one particular product or group too high, it wouldn't sell. Then they would lose money. And no one likes to lose money. If both healthy food and junk food were priced in accordance with market forces, profit will be maximized.

    No one in the food industry cares if you eat junk or not. They just want the most money possible. Just like you and I do.

  2. #56
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    On the forums
    Posts
    8,345

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    And yet gain skipster you are wrong. Whoever is born in America really has no chance to decide what he thinks of junk food as it is everywhere. As you get older you get conditioned to think that junk food is part of human food regimen.

    You drive on the highway and all you see is McDonalds at stops and other fast food places. You got no choice if you want to get a quick meal!

  3. #57

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    Don't people have the ability to think for themselves? Aren't there people who don't eat much junk food? The answers to those questions are both 'Yes,' indicating that YOU are wrong and that people ARE able to make their own decisions in America. Besides, just the consumption of junk food is not necessarily the problem. Over-consumption of junk food and lack of exercise are the main problems. One candy bar once in a while is not necessarily harnful.

    But, when we examine your sentence "As you get older you get conditioned to think that junk food is part of human food regimen" we see that you are assuming that people MUST blindly do whatever they are told. We know this is NOT true, because froma young age people are told to not do wrong (think school here), not to do drugs, and to stay in school. Those things don't always happen. These examples mostdefinitely show that people don't "get" conditioned -- they do think for themselves.

    Your last pair of sentences "You drive on the highway and all you see is McDonalds at stops and other fast food places. You got no choice if you want to get a quick meal!" assumes that the only time tha tpeople cna possibly eat is when they're driving and that they can not take advantage of the healthy alternatives of roadside stands or the healthy menu items of some fast food restaurants. You also assume that the only possilbe meal is a quick one.

    Additionally, you insert the phrase "if you want to get a quick meal." Eating healthy and eating quick are not always compatible, thus if you want to eat healthy, you may not opt for the quick meal. But, the main point of this phrase is the word WANT, which explicitly indicates that a choice is made. YOu are then telling us that people have a choice, which is conradictory to what you said earlier when you told us that people don't have a choice.

    Sure, if you want a quick meal, you may eat something unhealthy. If you want nicotine, you may be doing something unhealthy also. Or, if you want alochol, you may be doing something unhelathy. If you want to get to work quickly, you may be doing something unhealthy (exceeding speed limits). Some decisions are not conducive to good health, but that is just the consequence of that action. We know that not all behaviors are healthy. We know that there is little or no healthy way to ingest nicotine. So, if you want to stay healthy, you simply don't ingest nicotine. Similarly, if you want to stay healthy, you may have to skip those food options while driving on the highway and either eat healthy items before you leave, after you reach your destination, or pack them to take with you on your trip. Healthy foods are not always the most convenient, but they ARE still a choice.

  4. #58
    National Finalist
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    832

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    You drive on the highway and all you see is McDonalds at stops and other fast food places. You got no choice if you want to get a quick meal!

    I believe that is the definition of fast food.

  5. #59
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    On the forums
    Posts
    8,345

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    You people are too much. If I want to get a quick meal it doesn't mean it is supposed to be prepared from some crap in a really fast way. I want to get it quick but that doesn't mean the food place shouldn't spend a good time preparing the food well and healthy.

    I lived in Soviet Union without much advertising. It was a relief not having to listen to advertising crap everywhere I turn. If I need something I find where I can get it. I don't need some idiot commercial on TV, radio, or newspaper to tell me what I should get.

  6. #60
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    It's a long way from East Colorado
    Posts
    3,740

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    Quote Originally Posted by Ground&Pound View Post
    Isn't it basic economics that demand drives the market?

    If people wanted apples and oranges instead of BigMacs and fries, there would be fruit stands at every highway exit.

    --------

    How much advertising did Levi jeans do in the USSR in the 80's?

    The demand was huge and they were selling on the black market for big $.
    Many would agree with your premise, but I think it is a over simplification as to how things actually work. Industry is actively trying to create demand. It doesn't necessarily come from innate human desires (as your premise suggests). For example, there's nothing natural about drinking soda pop, nor does the body's interest in sugar (which accounts for why some drink it) explain the mass consumption and growing consumption of the product.

    Did we all worry (or did our wives or girlfriends all think about) ED before the non-stop Vigra (and related product) advertisements started appearing on our favorite TV programs? (sports)?

    It's quite evident to me that quite often with the products and services I use (e.g., phone, cable TV, credit cards, grocery stores), that the entities who provide these are oriented more toward their interests than mine. This also is inconsistent with your premise.

    Your comparison of fruit to BigMacs is an "apples and oranges" comparison (sorry I couldn't resist): a meal (which we all need) compared to a specific food item that doesn't satisfy the need for a meal.

    Your Levi example stands for the opposite of what you propose. The interest in the USSR stems from the marketing of Levi's in the U.S. and (presumably) other places, even if they were not directly advertised in the USSR. A prime example of a company creating demand.

    See Big's comments about life without advertising. If products were created based on consumer demand (and not demand created by the company), why would we need incessant advertising in our lives?
    Last edited by matclone; 09-10-2007 at 11:18 AM.

  7. #61
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    On the forums
    Posts
    8,345

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    Exactly right matclone. A good example is TV commercials. They are there because companies pay for them and not because people want to see them.

  8. #62
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    It's a long way from East Colorado
    Posts
    3,740

    Default Re: Psychology vs Free will vs no Free will

    That reminds me of all the commercial news channels (e.g,. ESPN, CNN, NBC, Fox, your local TV channels), with all their irritating graphics, schizophrenic-like displays of footage, constant telling you what they're going to show you next (instead of just showing you what they have), and ever-irrelevant displays of information). Why do I watch these? One, the choices we have for such information are limited (e.g., ESPN or Fox). Two, I'm willing to sit through the crap to see something I want (has anyone ever turned to a channel and watched 30 minutes of nothing in the hopes that you'd see one minute of wrestling coverage?). Three, habit of turning on the TV.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •