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Thread: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

  1. #19
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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    Quote Originally Posted by oc View Post
    Big, You choose to hang with some strange people, The R man abandoned his 5 children to an orphange (a death sentance if you didn't supply money for food, which he didn't), this didn't stop him from writing a book (Emily?) about how to raise kids. He was a bum.
    He was persecuted for his ideas and his life was in danger on a daily basis. Would you want your kids to live in that kind of environment?

  2. #20
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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    He was a second rate intellectual for hire, the Erasmus of his time. He preached one thing and did the other like maybe no one before him. See, Intellectuals by, Paul Johnson, he has a nice section on Jean. Also, he was often in troble because he was sleeping withother mens wives, some of the cuckholds saw this as an honor, many others did not. I could didh some more on him if you like Big but the book is better.

  3. #21
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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    oc,

    Should we dismiss his ideas because he was not a good family man? How Christian! Let me tell you many Popes of his time slept with many women.
    Last edited by Big; 08-14-2007 at 02:35 PM.

  4. #22
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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    Sexually active popes
    Saint Peter, traditionally the first Pope, was married, known to have taken his wife along on his apostolic/mission journeys (1 Cor. 9:5).
    Pope St. Hormisdas (514–523) was married and widowed before ordination. He was the father of Pope Silverius. [1]
    Pope Adrian II (867–872) was married, before taking orders, and had a daughter.
    Pope Sergius III (904–911) was supposedly the father of Pope John XI by Marozia (Source: Liber Pontificalis, Liutprand of Cremona).
    Pope John XII (955–963) (deposed by Conclave) was said to have turned the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano into a brothel and was accused of adultery, fornication, and incest (Source: Patrologia Latina).[2]
    Pope Clement IV (1265–1268) was married, before taking holy orders, and had two daughters.
    Pope Pius II (1458–1464) had at least two illegitimate children (one in Strasbourg and one in Scotland.[citation needed]
    Pope Innocent VIII (1484–1492) had several illegitimate children.
    Pope Alexander VI (1492–1503) had a notably long affair with Vannozza dei Cattanei before his papacy, by whom he had his famous illegitimate children Cesare and Lucrezia. A later mistress, Giulia Farnese, was the sister of Alessandro Farnese, who later became Pope Paul III. Rumors of Alexander's sexual activity were even more wild — see Banquet of Chestnuts. He fathered a total of seven children.
    Pope Julius II (1503–1513) had three illegitimate daughters.
    Pope Clement VII (1523–1534) was probably the father of Alessandro de' Medici, whom he made Duke of Florence.
    Pope Paul III (1534–1549) held off ordination in order to continue his promiscuous lifestyle, fathering four illegitimate children by his mistress. His nickname was "Cardinal Petticoat" because his sister Giulia had been Alexander VI's mistress. He made his illegitimate son Pier Luigi Farnese the first Duke of Parma.
    Pope Pius IV (1559–1565) had several illegitimate children.
    Pope Gregory XIII (1572–1585) had an illegitimate son before he took holy orders.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...y_active_popes

  5. #23
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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    And who can forget the most famous royal adulterer, Louis XIV?

    In 1660, Louis married his first cousin, Marie-Thérèse, in a political arrangement. While unfailingly kind to the official "Queen of Versailles," Louis sought others to satisfy his romantic and sexual desires. After a flirtation with his sister-in-law, his first important mistress was Louise de La Vallière, who bore him several children before being replaced by the tempestuous and brilliant Athénaïs, marquise de Montespan. Later, when Athénaïs’s reputation was tarnished, the king continued to support her publicly until Athénaïs left court for a life of repentance. Meanwhile her children’s governess, the intelligent and seemingly puritanical Françoise de Maintenon, had already won the king’s affections; in a relationship in complete contrast to his physical obsession with Athénaïs, Louis XIV lived happily with Madame de Maintenon for the rest of his life, very probably marrying her in secret. When his grandson’s child bride, the enchanting Adelaide of Savoy, came to Versaille she lightened the king’s last years—until tragedy struck.

    With consummate skill, Antonia Fraser weaves insights into the nature of women’s religious lives—as well as such practical matters as contraception—into her magnificent, sweeping portrait of the king, his court, and his ladies.

    http://www.readinggroupguides.com/gu...and_louis1.asp

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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    I read Intellectuals years ago. In hindsight, it seems Paul Johnson took upon himself the task of finding whatever personal dirt he could find on any intellectual whose ideas didn't coincide with his own. I also have the impression that it was anti-intellectual in its theme--since it was all about how flawed the subject intellectuals were. I agree with Big. These people should be measured by the quality and contribution of their ideas, not by whether they were perfect beings.

  7. #25
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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    As for Rosseau, I can't say I know or understand his ideas well enough to render an opinion, but he is prominent centuries later, so even if his ideas were flawed or based on flawed premises, I would never call him a second-rate intellectual (I'm invoking a conservative principle here).

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    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    Rousseau basically says materialism is a Pyrhhic victory where people can buy more and better goods but in the process the society and its values become rotten. He takes the long term approach. He says materialism was invented by the few rich and powerful people and it is not natural because it took the masses by force. Meaning by conquests and persecution. A good example is American Indians but really thousands and thousands of people in the Medieval times.

  9. #27

    Default Re: Jean-Jaques Rousseau, finally a man that thinks like me!

    Quote Originally Posted by matclone View Post
    As for Rosseau, I can't say I know or understand his ideas well enough to render an opinion, but he is prominent centuries later, so even if his ideas were flawed or based on flawed premises, I would never call him a second-rate intellectual (I'm invoking a conservative principle here).
    The battle is joined.

    Who has called Rousseau a second rate intellectual?

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