Page 1 of 6 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 9 of 51

Thread: Health Care a Right?

  1. #1

    Default Health Care a Right?

    Lest We've Forgotten, Health Care Is Not a Right

    By Wendy Milling
    The advocates of socialized medicine have insisted for decades that health care is a right. They now feel emboldened enough to proffer the absurdity that health insurance is a right, and they do not bother to make a distinction between the two. "Health care is a right, not a privilege," proclaims Sen. Bernie Sanders in a Huffington Post op-ed calling for the nationalization of medicine. Medicine has become "a business" instead of a higher calling of selfless service, President Obama ruefully tells the American Medical Association.
    A right is a political principle defining and sanctioning freedom of action in a social context. It imposes a negative obligation-the obligation to refrain from violating the rights of others-not a positive entitlement. Since government produces nothing, for the government to provide goods and services to some, it must first take them by force from others, which is a violation of their rights.
    <!-- OAS_AD('Block'); //-->
    A privilege connotes a benefit conferred upon individuals or classes by virtue of some factor such as birth or social position, as opposed to merit. The criterion by which people receive medical care is payment. Medicine can only exist because its suppliers earn profits that justify their initial substantial investments of money, energy, and time. That makes medicine a business, whether anyone finds this distasteful or not.
    Patients must pay for their medical care somehow. Money is obtained through effort; people receive money in exchange for productive work. Sen. Sanders' objection, then, is to people obtaining medical care because they have earned it. By advocating the redistribution of medical resources, he is seeking to elevate the needy to a privileged class. For health care to be a "right," it must be a privilege.
    The economics of socialized medicine are well-known. When free medical care becomes available, hypochondriacs and system-gamers line up at the socialized medicine trough, along with genuinely sick people who seek more services than are justified for their condition. Demand overwhelms supply, and costs go up. Government then imposes price caps on medical goods and services and limits payments to providers to control the escalating costs. This attempted end run around the law of supply and demand forces the suppliers to cut back on the availability, quality, and quantity of medical care. Again, governments produce nothing. They can decree coverage or insurance for everyone, but they have no power to turn this coverage into adequate medical care. Only those who produce medical goods and services can provide them.
    Knowing that Americans do not tolerate the impractical, the proponents of socialized medicine have engaged in all manner of contorted exercises lately to make the unworkable appear workable. They back up their calculations with a secret weapon: The citizen's feelings of guilt. "It's a moral issue," assert the advocates of socialized medicine. It certainly is, but not in the way they think. It is immoral to steal and coerce. Doctors are not chattel, and taxpayers are not piggy banks to be broken and raided for the next claimant in line.
    The advocates of socialized medicine argue that people should not have to go into bankruptcy just because they are burdened with medical bills they cannot pay. Yes, they should. Bankruptcy does not mean death in this country. It means officially recognized insolvency, which merely puts conditions on the defaulter's financial activity for a specified amount of time into the future. Bankruptcy is a consequence of the defaulter's failure to meet legal financial obligations. The principle at work is justice, the application of cause-and-effect to human affairs.
    Those who wish to insure their health have a number of proper choices: They can live safely and healthily, they can accumulate wealth or credit to pay for medical expenses, they can purchase private health insurance, they can seek employment that provides health coverage, they can seek a doctor who is willing to provide payment terms or free services, or they can rely on the charity of others. If a person fails to take any of these measures for any reason and he incurs medical expenses he cannot meet, he must enter into bankruptcy. What he may not properly do is claim that health care and health insurance are "rights" to which he is entitled at the expense of others.
    Consider the full meaning of such a claim. Millions of working poor will see a portion of their meager earnings confiscated. New drugs and medical technologies will not be created when they otherwise would, because there is no economic incentive to develop or produce them. Doctors and other health care professionals will work under increasingly primitive and coercive conditions, potentially facing de-licensing, fines, and even jail time for making decisions the government deems too costly or politically out-of-favor.
    Patients will see the quality, quantity, and availability of medical care evaporate. The gravely sick will be denied care and forced to face the end of their existence, because saving their lives is too costly under a system of socialized medicine. For what noble purpose will millions of people be effectively enslaved or burdened to the point of suffering or death? To preserve the FICO score, credit lines, and self-esteem of parasites.
    The next time a socialized medicine advocate prattles about compassion for those who need medical care, wonder aloud where his compassion is for those whose lives would be destroyed by his scheme.

    http://www.realclearmarkets.com/arti...ght_97241.html
    Last edited by ArmyFan; 06-24-2009 at 09:40 AM. Reason: I added the link.

  2. #2
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    It's a long way from East Colorado
    Posts
    3,740

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wendy Milling
    The advocates of socialized medicine have insisted for decades that health care is a right.
    An essay that opens with a strawman argument should be a red flag to any discerning reader. The rhetorical phrase "The advocates of socialized medicine" reminds me of the rhetorical phrase "the open borders crowd". Have any of our Congressional leaders, or even the man on the street, called for "socialized medicine" or "open borders". No.

    Of course if you're a "true believer" then it doesn't matter. The writer is telling you something you already believe.

    The question, properly framed, would be "Should health care be a right", not "Is health care a right". Obviously it is not currently a right for all people.

  3. #3
    World Champ ODH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,968

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    The author's position is so extreme that it doesn't allow debate over the question in her title. I think it is a legitimate question if we want a minimal level of health care coverage for all citizens (i.e make it a right).

    Are hospitals going to refuse people without healthcare? I don't think they can now, so everyone with health insurance is subsidizing that now.
    Would we accept people dying for lack of health insurance.


    This statement shows how radical the authors views are.
    Since government produces nothing, for the government to provide goods and services to some, it must first take them by force from others, which is a violation of their rights.
    Is taxing people "taking goods and services by force" and is it a "violation of their rights"?

  4. #4
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    It's a long way from East Colorado
    Posts
    3,740

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    The last time I drove on a public highway (yesterday as a matter of fact), I was nearly despondent over the thought that the government forced some poor sod (presumably at the point of a gun) to pay for the construction and maintenance of said road so that I, I, could travel fairly unencumbered to my destination.

  5. #5
    Ancient Arachnid Spider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    5,424

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    This is a very important issue, and one that I find myself on both sides of. While dentistry isn't medicine and I rarely deal with life threatening conditions, healthcare is healthcare and where medicine goes, dentistry soon follows.

    On the one hand, as a healthcare practitionner, I worked hard for my degree, then I worked hard to pay off my student loans, my job demands a high degree of mechanical precision, technical knowledge and people skills, and it requires me to assume a great deal of responsibility that doesn't end when I close the door to my office at the end of the day. I feel that I have the right to work as I please, charge whatever fee I please, and treat whomever I please. There are some limits to these freedoms: I have to maintain a certain standard of care, I can't refuse to treat someone because of race, disability (including AIDS), etc., and I am forced to accept some insurance companies' fee maximums as payment in full if I wish to treat their subscribers. Still, I feel that I deserve a certain amount of autonomy and freedom from government intervention.

    On the other hand, when my wife needed a very expensive procedure which could possibly save her life, and our insurance company denied coverage for it until we found an attorney who forced them to pay, I got a taste of what it is like for the uninsured. What would someone do in a case like this? They would have to sit back and watch a loved one suffer and die because of lack of money. Healthcare isn't just a quality of life issue, it's a life or death issue. What function of government is more important than providing essential healthcare for its citizens?

    Everyone should have access to healthcare. Doctors shouldn't have to become civil servants, but should be able to maintain the high standards of their profession and should be adequately compensated. Is healthcare a right or a privilege? I don't know.
    Atrophy: what you get when you win atournament.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    I tell ya, these right wingers are complete assholes. They are an embarrassment to the human race.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    Spider, I don't begrudge doctors and dentists, et al for their fees. The insurance companies are a whole nother issue, though. My wife works in insurance so she has seen first hand what her industry is all about.

    Here's an article that I posted previously that gets to the crux of the issue:
    http://www.expressmilwaukee.com/arti...#sCommentN3237
    Your ignorance is painful to witness.....

  8. #8

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    Quote Originally Posted by washed up wrestler View Post
    I tell ya, these right wingers are complete assholes. They are an embarrassment to the human race.
    lol....Do you have something to talk about on this issue?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Health Care a Right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Black-n-Red View Post
    Spider, I don't begrudge doctors and dentists, et al for their fees. The insurance companies are a whole nother issue, though. My wife works in insurance so she has seen first hand what her industry is all about.

    Here's an article that I posted previously that gets to the crux of the issue:
    http://www.expressmilwaukee.com/arti...#sCommentN3237
    I think you are right there are issues with the insurance companies as a whole coupled with people suing the insurance companies and winning in stupid lawsuits.

    My father is an attorney for some large insurance companies and it is amazing what people will sue for. Now some are legit but most are just people trying to scam for more money.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •