Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 9 of 13
Discuss NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates at the Non Wrestling Talk within the Wrestling Talk Forums; Tournament teams improve APR scores Associated Press North Carolina, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Connecticut share a ...
  1. #1
    Super Moderator Stardust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    5,838

    Default NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    Tournament teams improve APR scores
    Associated Press

    North Carolina, Pittsburgh, Louisville and Connecticut share a No. 1 seeding in the NCAA tournament. Their graduation rates have less in common.

    The numbers ranged from 86 percent at North Carolina to 33 percent at UConn, according to a report released Monday by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida.

    Louisville was at 42 percent and Pitt at 69 percent.

    The study also found that fewer tournament teams have failing Academic Progress Rates than last year. Twenty-one of the 65 tournament teams have APR scores under 925, the cutoff below which the NCAA can penalize schools. Last year, 35 teams had APR scores below 925.

    Graduation rates remained similar to last year. Forty of the teams had graduation rates of at least 50 percent.

    The graduation rates were based on whether freshmen who entered school between the 1998-99 and 2001-02 school years earned diplomas within six years.

    Seven teams had a 100 percent graduation rate: Binghamton, Florida State, Marquette, Robert Morris, Utah State, Wake Forest and Western Kentucky.

    The five lowest rates were at Cal State Northridge (8 percent), Maryland (10 percent), Portland State (17 percent), Arizona (20 percent) and Clemson (29 percent).

    The study noted the ongoing gaps between the graduation rates of white and African-American players. Twenty-five tournament teams had a gap of 20 percentage points or more between the two groups.
    Super 32 Challenge - October 26-27, 2013

    "Good things happen when you wrestle for a full seven minutes." -- Jayson Ness, post-finals press conference

  2. #2
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    It's a long way from East Colorado
    Posts
    3,740

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    Eee gads! Terp has some 'splainin to do

  3. #3
    NCAA Champ WrestlingTerp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,291

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    1. 10 year old data.

    2. Doesn't include athletes who completed their eligibility in good academic standing but had the opportunity to play bball professionally. Many go to Europe and make will into the six figures.

    3. Small sample size. NCAA allows 13 head count scholarships in basketball. You have 1 or 2 that fail and the numbers are skewed.

    4. Not a level playing field. Duke's semester ends almost a month before Maryland's. A bball player at Duke only has to go to classes for another week or two after the final four and can still go to the pro combines. Maryland a kid has to go to class for another 5 or 6 weeks while considering how to prepare for the combines. I don't know when UNC's spring semester ends, but Maryland is later than most.

    Imagine being a 21 or 22 year old and you have to decide between sitting in class for 6 weeks, or jump at the chance to make $180,000 to play basketball. It's easy for the press and others to be idealistic and say they should stay in school. But that isn't reality.

    5. Duke gives credit to their bball players when they go on a summer tour of, say Europe. Maryland doesn't provide that academic flexibility.

    6. Finally there probably were a couple of players who didn't belong in college. This data is before the start of the NCAA's APR, which has changed recruiting focuses in it's wake.

    Maryland has a goal of trying to get basketball players primarily, within 15 semester hours of graduation by the end of their 4th year so that obtaining a degree doesn't seem so insurmountable. We are also one of the leaders in bringing athletes back to campus under service scholarships so that they can finish their degrees after their pro career, or other life event is over that may have forced them to leave school.
    "Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!?

  4. #4
    National Finalist Ignatius J. Reilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Bettendorf
    Posts
    827

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    whatever makes you sleep better at night, Terp.
    "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in a confederacy against him."

  5. #5
    World Champ The Big Stiffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Newberry SC
    Posts
    1,725

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    The average graduation rate of all college men's basketball teams is around 68% I believe. I did a paper over student athletes and men's basketball and football had sadly low graduation rates. Football has the same rate as men's basketball. I think this is a pretty sad stat. Also the going pro argument doesn't hold a lot of water whether it is in the NBA or over in Europe. There are 334 or so NCAA division 1 teams. Only counting 10 people on a team means there are 3340 athletes competing. If say 300 of these guys make it to the next level early (which I think is a bit high) that only accounts for about 9% of the athletes. What about the other 20%?
    Curtis Chenoweth
    wannabe national champ headed to a new home:walkman:

  6. #6
    NCAA Champ
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Oxnard California
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    Who Cares? It's Basketball...

  7. #7
    NCAA Champ WrestlingTerp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,291

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    Quote Originally Posted by Ignatius J. Reilly View Post
    whatever makes you sleep better at night, Terp.
    No, just trying to correct simplistic statistics that don't consider the differences between schools. The graduation rates among Terp basketball players over the past five years has improved dramatically.

    Since you're such a smart ass I'm sure you know, for example, that all three of last year's seniors on the bball team graduated. And 4 of 5 graduated in 2007 with the one going pro as mentioned in my previous post.
    "Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!?

  8. #8
    Olympic Champ
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    It's a long way from East Colorado
    Posts
    3,740

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    Quote Originally Posted by WrestlingTerp View Post
    3. Small sample size. NCAA allows 13 head count scholarships in basketball. You have 1 or 2 that fail and the numbers are skewed.
    Good point--that I should have seen right away but didn't. One might assume they were covering a number of years to give a larger sample, but you don't really know from the information given.

  9. #9
    National Finalist Ignatius J. Reilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Bettendorf
    Posts
    827

    Default Re: NCAA Bball tourney teams - graduation rates

    Quote Originally Posted by WrestlingTerp View Post
    1. 10 year old data.

    2. Doesn't include athletes who completed their eligibility in good academic standing but had the opportunity to play bball professionally. Many go to Europe and make will into the six figures.

    3. Small sample size. NCAA allows 13 head count scholarships in basketball. You have 1 or 2 that fail and the numbers are skewed.

    4. Not a level playing field. Duke's semester ends almost a month before Maryland's. A bball player at Duke only has to go to classes for another week or two after the final four and can still go to the pro combines. Maryland a kid has to go to class for another 5 or 6 weeks while considering how to prepare for the combines. I don't know when UNC's spring semester ends, but Maryland is later than most.

    Imagine being a 21 or 22 year old and you have to decide between sitting in class for 6 weeks, or jump at the chance to make $180,000 to play basketball. It's easy for the press and others to be idealistic and say they should stay in school. But that isn't reality.

    5. Duke gives credit to their bball players when they go on a summer tour of, say Europe. Maryland doesn't provide that academic flexibility.

    6. Finally there probably were a couple of players who didn't belong in college. This data is before the start of the NCAA's APR, which has changed recruiting focuses in it's wake.

    Maryland has a goal of trying to get basketball players primarily, within 15 semester hours of graduation by the end of their 4th year so that obtaining a degree doesn't seem so insurmountable. We are also one of the leaders in bringing athletes back to campus under service scholarships so that they can finish their degrees after their pro career, or other life event is over that may have forced them to leave school.

    1. 10 year old data.

    It is ten year old data for the other schools, too

    2. Doesn't include athletes who completed their eligibility in good academic standing but had the opportunity to play bball professionally. Many go to Europe and make will into the six figures.

    Doesn't include athletes who completed their eligibility in good academic standing but had the opportunity to play bball professionally for all of the other schools, either. Many go to Europe and make will into the six figures from other schools, too.


    3. Small sample size. NCAA allows 13 head count scholarships in basketball. You have 1 or 2 that fail and the numbers are skewed.

    It was a small sample size for the other schools, too.

    Imagine being a 21 or 22 year old and you have to decide between sitting in class for 6 weeks, or jump at the chance to make $180,000 to play basketball. It's easy for the press and others to be idealistic and say they should stay in school. But that isn't reality.

    Imagine being a 21 or 22 year old for the other schools, too.

    6. Finally there probably were a couple of players who didn't belong in college.

    There were probably a couple of players who didn't belong in college for the other schools, too.

    Basically nearly all your arguments can be directly applied to all the other elite DI programs. Actually, many of the schools ranked ahead of Maryland send WAY more kids to Europe and the NBA than the Terps. Yet they don't have the absolute and abysmal, shameful 10% graduation rate.

    Discuss.
    "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in a confederacy against him."

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

user tags

ncaa tournament teams graduation rates

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •