OSHA itself has stated regarding secondhand smoke:

"Field studies of environmental tobacco smoke indicate that under normal conditions, the components in tobacco smoke are diluted below existing Permissible Exposure Levels (PELS.) as referenced in the Air Contaminant Standard (29 CFR 1910.1000)...It would be very rare to find a workplace with so much smoking that any individual PEL would be exceeded."

-Letter From Greg Watchman, Acting Ass't Sec'y, OSHA, To Leroy J Pletten, PHD, July 8, 1997


In 1999, comments were solicited by the government from an independent Public and Health Policy Research group, Littlewood & Fennel of Austin, Tx, on the subject of secondhand smoke.

Using EPA figures on the emissions per cigarette of everything measurable in secondhand smoke, they compared them to OSHA's PELs.

The following excerpt and chart are directly from their report and their Washington testimony:

CALCULATING THE NON-EXISTENT RISKS OF ETS

"We have taken the substances for which measurements have actually been obtained--very few, of course, because it's difficult to even find these chemicals in diffuse and diluted ETS.

"We posit a sealed, unventilated enclosure that is 20 feet square with a 9 foot ceiling clearance.

"Taking the figures for ETS yields per cigarette directly from the EPA, we calculated the number of cigarettes that would be required to reach the lowest published "danger" threshold for each of these substances. The results are actually quite amusing. In fact, it is difficult to imagine a situation where these threshold limits could be realized.

"Our chart (Table 1) illustrates each of these substances, but let me report some notable examples.

"For Benzo[a]pyrene, 222,000 cigarettes would be required to reach the lowest published "danger" threshold.

"For Acetone, 118,000 cigarettes would be required.

"Toluene would require 50,000 packs of simultaneously smoldering cigarettes.

"At the lower end of the scale-- in the case of Acetaldehyde or Hydrazine, more than 14,000 smokers would need to light up simultaneously in our little room to reach the threshold at which they might begin to pose a danger.

"For Hydroquinone, "only" 1250 cigarettes are required. Perhaps we could post a notice limiting this 20-foot square room to 300 rather tightly-packed people smoking no more than 62 packs per hour?

"Of course the moment we introduce real world factors to the room -- a door, an open window or two, or a healthy level of mechanical air exchange (remember, the room we've been talking about is sealed) achieving these levels becomes even more implausible.

"It becomes increasingly clear to us that ETS is a political, rather than scientific, scapegoat."

Chart -

CALCULATED NUMBER OF CIGARETTES REQUIRED TO REACH A THRESHOLD LIMIT FROM ETS IN A SEALED, UNVENTILATED 100m3 ENCLOSURE AT STP (1)

ETS Component CAS Number Molecular Weight ETS Output (mg/cigarette)(2) Threshold Limit (ppm) Threshold Limit (mg/m3) Cigarettes Required

2-Toluidine (3 isomers) (3) 107.15 0.003 2 8.7 290,000
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 44.05 1.26 111 180 (4) 14,285
Acetic acid 64-19-7 60.05 1.5 10 25 1,666
Acetone 67-64-1 58.05 1 500 1187 118,700
Benzene 71-43-2 78.11 0.24 1 3.1 (5) 1,290
Benzo[a]Pyrene 50-32-8 252.30 0.00009 0.02 0.2 (6) 222,000
Cadmium 7440-43-9 112.40 0.0007 0.002 0.01 1,430
Catechol 120-80-9 110.11 0.14 5 22 15,700
Dimethylamine 124-40-3 45.08 0.036 10 (7) 9.2 25,555
Formic acid 64-18-6 46.02 0.525 5 (8) 9.4 1,790
Hydrazine 302-01-2 32.05 0.00009 0.01 0.013 14,444
Hydroquinone 123-31-9 110.11 0.16 0.4 2 1,250
Methylamine 74-89-5 31.09 0.1 5 13 13,000
Methylchloride 74-87-3 50.49 0.88 50 103.0 11,170
Nickel 7440-02-0 58.71 0.0025 0.4 1 40,000
Phenol 108-95-2 94.11 0.25 5 19 7,600
Polonium 210 (9) 210 0.4pCi na 3pCi/liter (10) 750,000
Pyridine 110-86-1 70.01 0.39 5 16 4,100
Toluene 108-88-3 92.13 0.000035 50 375 1,000,000
These calculations are not complex. They assume a 100m3 enclosed and unventilated space at Standard Temperature and Pressure. STP assumes 24.45 = molar volume of air in liters at STP conditions (25oC. and 760 torr). Conversion equations are as follow:

(TLV in ppm)(gram mol wt of substance) (TLV in mg/m3)(24.45)
TLV in mg/m3 = ______________________________ TLV in ppm = ___________________
24.45 gram mol wt of substance


link to chart - http://www.nycclash.com/smoke_chart.html