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Thread: should women wrestle

  1. #1

    Default should women wrestle

    it has been a big question in the past few years. what do you think, and why?

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  3. #3

    Default Re: should women wrestle

    Look here for my answer.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/TonyAvallone
    http://www.youtube.com/TonyAvallone
    Dad of Karissa 155lb Varsity College Freshman

  4. #4

    Default Re: should women wrestle

    Quote Originally Posted by jmchone View Post
    it has been a big question in the past few years. what do you think, and why?
    Of course they should! I have been wrestling for 11 years and it's been one of the best experiences of my life.

    In the past decade, I have seen the US Senior Women's Nationals double if not triple in participation, I have seen the rise of women's college programs, the addition of a women's college national championships, and the addition of women's wrestling to the Olympics. It is growing in popularity, and if we can get women's wrestling sanctioned by the NCAA, then it might help to balance gender quotas and could possibly save many of the men's teams that are being cut due to Title IX.

    I think the debate comes in when girls wrestle boys in high school. I feel that if possible, girls should compete against other girls and pursue competition in girls' only USGWA tournaments and the events sanctioned by USA Wrestling. If states follow Texas and Hawaii and create all-girls' high school teams that dual each other, I think that the topic of women's wrestling would be less of an issue to many who disapprove.

    Jmchone, what is your opinion on the topic?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: should women wrestle

    Yes, as long as there is plenty of mud or Jello.

    But seriously, folks . . .

    Sure they should. I agree with DH that a tougher question is should girls wrestle against boys in high school? Practically speaking, there aren't enough girls' high school teams to provide any competition, and I've seen some pretty accomplished girls who could compete well against boys, but I'm still not sure it's really proper. There aren't any other co-ed contact sports in high school that I'm aware of, and wrestling involves more contact than any other sport.

    BTW, a few years ago, my high school (Brookline. MA) had a full girls team (don't know if they still do), and they hosted an east coast girls' tournament. I brought a girl from the team I coach in Connecticut, and she placed third.
    Atrophy: what you get when you win atournament.

  6. #6

    Default Re: should women wrestle

    Quote Originally Posted by Spider View Post

    BTW, a few years ago, my high school (Brookline. MA) had a full girls team (don't know if they still do), and they hosted an east coast girls' tournament. I brought a girl from the team I coach in Connecticut, and she placed third.
    I didn't know you went to Brookline. I went to Cambridge Rindge and Latin HS and practiced with the Brookline girls my senior year in high school (and occasionally in college before the team kinda fell apart).

    They used to host a huge girls' tournament, but now I believe it's run as the New England tournament for the USGWA and it's being held in Boston.

    What year did you go to the tournament?

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    Default Re: should women wrestle

    I was at the tournament in 1999. In 1963, I was in the first varsity wrestling match ever at Brookline High (and my pin clinched the meet ).

    When I went back to BHS in '99 as a coach (a weird deja vu experience), the Athletic Director was Dustin Carter, who had wrestled at Wesleyan while I was in college. Apparently, he really promoted the sport at the school. Also, Fred Andre (a heavyweight from MIT who had placed fourth in the NCAA's) had a daughter on the team.
    Last edited by Spider; 02-09-2008 at 08:55 AM.
    Atrophy: what you get when you win atournament.

  8. #8

    Default Re: should women wrestle

    I agree that the bigger question is, "Why don't more states offer girls the opportunity to compete against each other?" Yes, we can all point to Michaela Hutchison and say that there are girls who can compete with and defeat boys, but what we're really doing is keeping girls off the mat. Here in Iowa, wrestling has been a part of the culture since Frank Gotsch ruled the world. When I was in high school ('60s) Iowa was one of the leading states in the nation in terms of percentage of female students participating in interscholastic sports and Denise Long was perhaps one of the best known high school athletes in the country. The girls state basketball tournament here is one of our 2 or 3 most popular sporting events (more people watch it on TV than watch the high school football championships).

    With that heritage it is ludicrous that Iowa doesn't give girls the better opportunity to wrestle - which is to compete against each other. I know of a girl from a well-known wrestling family who attends a storied wrestling high school in the state and who battled hard in the pre-season to get into the starting lineup and lost some close wrestle-offs. Who knows what will happen with her in the future, but are we hindering the development of a future Olympic medalist by not giving her enough opportunities to get on the mat?

    I know the answers - leadership and money. Girls wrestling needs its own Billie Jean King and its own Phil Knight.

    BTW - Avallone - keep posting the videos.

  9. #9

    Default Re: should women wrestle

    Excellent thread with very thoughtful responses...

    Jim, I think you've come up with exactly the approach that should be used to open up opportunities for young women to get started in wrestling...

    It seems that both the wrestling world and the non-wrestling world at large have two "hang-ups" about women's wrestling:
    > "I don't like the idea of boys and girls all tangled up on the mat together."
    > "It doesn't seem fair to girls when they lose to boys... and it doesn't seem fair to a boy when he loses to a girl."

    Having separate competition for young women solves those problems... and it opens doors for the next Tricia Saunders or Danielle Hobeika. (Your example of the young woman from the wrestling family not making her HS team really got me -- we may denying her the opportunity to reach her full potential, and indeed, be missing out on a future Olympian and superstar.)

    What's more, having a female team and a male wrestling team in HS has other benefits:
    > It would generate positive publicity for the sport of wrestling as a whole
    > As more young women compete in high school and develop their skills, they would create a demand for more college programs for women
    > As more athletes of both sexes compete in wrestling, there are more fans in the stands and watching on TV... which helps boost the overall profile of the sport, and makes it less likely for college programs to be killed off, TV broadcasts to be cancelled, weight classes to be eliminated, etc.

    More opportunities mean more of a good thing for young athletes... and us fans.

    Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by gg121and2 View Post
    I agree that the bigger question is, "Why don't more states offer girls the opportunity to compete against each other?" Yes, we can all point to Michaela Hutchison and say that there are girls who can compete with and defeat boys, but what we're really doing is keeping girls off the mat. Here in Iowa, wrestling has been a part of the culture since Frank Gotsch ruled the world. When I was in high school ('60s) Iowa was one of the leading states in the nation in terms of percentage of female students participating in interscholastic sports and Denise Long was perhaps one of the best known high school athletes in the country. The girls state basketball tournament here is one of our 2 or 3 most popular sporting events (more people watch it on TV than watch the high school football championships).

    With that heritage it is ludicrous that Iowa doesn't give girls the better opportunity to wrestle - which is to compete against each other. I know of a girl from a well-known wrestling family who attends a storied wrestling high school in the state and who battled hard in the pre-season to get into the starting lineup and lost some close wrestle-offs. Who knows what will happen with her in the future, but are we hindering the development of a future Olympic medalist by not giving her enough opportunities to get on the mat?

    I know the answers - leadership and money. Girls wrestling needs its own Billie Jean King and its own Phil Knight.

    BTW - Avallone - keep posting the videos.

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