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Thread: Moving

  1. #10

    Default Re: Moving

    Quote Originally Posted by kajaet View Post
    Any individual has a right to move wherever they want for whatever reason.

    Any state athletic agency has the right to set their own rules to maintain a competive balance.

    Any school district has the right to choose whether they want to belong to the state athletic association. But if they join, they should abide by the rules in place.

    If an agency says you can't move for athletic intent or deny a transfer eligibility, it's because their primary consideration is maintaining the competitive balance.

    An athlete denied eligibility is not prevented from pursuing wrestling activities. He just cant compete for the high school team.

    The rules are simple.
    You read my mind, word for word.

  2. #11

    Default Re: Moving

    Quote Originally Posted by Ground&Pound View Post
    You read my mind, word for word.
    People have a problem with the denied eligibility rulings b/c they think PIAA or whatever organization is preventing Johnny from wrestling. That's false. Johnny can practice, join clubs, go wrestle in opens, whatever. The organization is ruling against the member schools use of the individual. If a school wants to become a magnet for wrestling talent, they should withdraw from the PIAA and wrestle an independent schedule.

  3. #12

    Default Re: Moving

    Henry Cejudo is a perfect example of a wrestler who took an alternative route to achieve his wrestling goals.

    He bypassed the NCAA (and all of its rules) and went straight to Olympic training.

    No one denied him his "right" to wrestle, however he is not allowed to wrestle in the NCAA Championship since he is not enrolled in college.

  4. #13

    Default Re: Moving

    Quote Originally Posted by Ground&Pound View Post
    Henry Cejudo is a perfect example of a wrestler who took an alternative route to achieve his wrestling goals.

    He bypassed the NCAA (and all of its rules) and went straight to Olympic training.

    No one denied him his "right" to wrestle, however he is not allowed to wrestle in the NCAA Championship since he is not enrolled in college.
    Amen!

  5. #14

    Default Re: Moving

    Quote Originally Posted by Ground&Pound View Post
    You read my mind, word for word.
    dang. if it was really word for word that's creepy. ha ha

  6. #15

    Default Re: Moving

    I think that any kid who is LEGALLY enrolled in a school should be able to wrestle for that school. The problems crop up when kids lie to get enrolled in a particular school, or worse, coaches lie to get a kid enrolled in his school. Around here it is more of a problem for football than wrestling, but there are some schools that have been accused of recruiting for wrestling.

    Here in FL it gets sticky because there are lots of little magnet programs in addition to the regular public schools. Students from anywhere in the county are eligible to apply for the magnet schools. It is really easy for the coaches at the magnet schools to get kids enrolled from anywhere in the county (we have county school districts) so there are always allegations of illegal recruiting at those schools. Those allegations are very difficult to prove because any child who is legally enrolled at a school is eligible for sports at that school. Nobody could ever prove that Johnny applied to the magnet strictly to wrestle. If Johnny is eligible for the magnet it doesn't really matter WHY he enrolled there.

    The same goes for private schools. It is illegal (according to FHSAA) to do athletic recruiting. However, the private schools offer all sorts of academic scholarships, and financial aid, making it difficult to prove that a student was recruited purely for athletic purposes. Athletes are not the only students offered financial aid, nor are they the only ones to qualify for academic scholarships. Plus-lots of parents of good athletes seek private school for their kids to get a better education. Athletics is just the means to get them there.

    How could anyone ever prove that a kid on scholarship was there for athletic reasons? My son was approached, as an 8th grader, by another private school in the local area to play lacrosse. The coach knew he was a good student and told him that he might qualify for an academic scholarship. Since he actually would qualify there would be no way to prove he was recruited specifically for athletics. Simply playing lacrosse would not be enough to prove he was there JUST for lacrosse. We opted to have him stay put because we feel he is best served where he is (at a smaller private school) not because of sports but how would anyone have known if we switched?

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