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Thread: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

  1. #1

    Default Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    I have read threads that talk about the rise in MRSA, which to my understanding is a very dangerous thing. Is this something that is showing up in the high school levels and should I be extra careful?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    Shower with soap and water and don't share towels is an easy way to decrease the risk tremendously. We had an instance of this last year, but it was on the football team.

    Having clean clothes, showering, and cleaning equipment(headgear, knee pads, shoes) will help prevent it.

    The bad thing is high school boys are not the cleanest individuals.
    I will smash your face into a car windshield and then take your mother, Dorothy Mantooth, out to a nice seafood dinner and never call her again!

    Tell me about it, this morning, I woke up and I shit a squirrel, but what I can't get is the damn thing is still alive. So now, I've got a shit covered squirrel running around my office and I don't know what to name it.

  3. #3
    Olympic Champ RYou's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    Yes it is. The incidence continues to grow. Minnesota shut down the HS programs last year over an outbreak. Two wrestlers at Michigan State and Michigan were hospitalized. Similar incidents have occurred across college, HS and junior mat room.

    Champ gives good advice. WASH WORKOUT CLOTHES EVERY DAY WITH HOT WATER AND ANTIBACTERIAL DETERGENT, don't leave them in the locker over night. Tell Mom and Dadit's is a must. Not only will that reduce the potential for MRSA but also ringworm, impatigo and other infectious diseases that plaque wrestling.

    Inspect your body. Your coach or trainer should be educating the team on what the pimples look like. If you catch it early you'll be back on the mat in no time. If not, you may be loking at much more time out of the wrestling room.

    Keep up wounds covered, even the smallest of scratches and ideal point of entry into your system. This is another point your coach and trainer should emphasize.

    Shower and soap up after every workout and meet before you go home.

    For more info Google MRSA USA Wrestling, they have developed a complete protection plan. If your coach hasn't provided education, print that doc and hand it to him.

    I've seen too many athletes removed from action over it, from wrestling, football, lacrosse, weight lifting to even a cross country team that was infected when the school did a batch wash of uniforms in cold water and cross contaminated three different teams. I can tell there is nothing worse than 12 angry mothers and female soccer players creaming an AD over uniforms that were infected from cross contamination in the university laundry room.
    Life's not the breaths you take, the breathing in and out that gets you through the day ain't what it's all about. It's the moments that take your breath away.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    Quote Originally Posted by Champ Kind View Post
    The bad thing is high school boys are not the cleanest individuals.
    Understatement of the year!

    In all seriousness MRSA is pretty serious.

    High school wrestlers-when your coach asks you to clean the mats please take it seriously. My son brings antibacterial wipes with him to tournaments and wipes himself down after every match. SHOWER as quickly as possible after every practice and tournament. WITH SOAP.

    Coaches-make sure your guys cover all their cuts and bruises in practice. Make sure they clean the mats daily.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    Quote Originally Posted by RYou View Post
    WASH WORKOUT CLOTHES EVERY DAY WITH HOT WATER AND ANTIBACTERIAL DETERGENT, don't leave them in the locker over night. Tell Mom and Dadit's is a must.
    Your entire post was FABULOUS. MRSA is serious and it is preventable.

    I just wanted to point out to the wrestlers that since this is a high school forum ALL OF THE WRESTLERS ARE OLD ENOUGH TO DO THEIR OWN LAUNDRY. If your parents are busy do it your self. I am sure your parents can show you how to do a load of laundry.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    Quote Originally Posted by Champ Kind View Post
    Shower with soap and water and don't share towels is an easy way to decrease the risk tremendously. We had an instance of this last year, but it was on the football team.

    Having clean clothes, showering, and cleaning equipment(headgear, knee pads, shoes) will help prevent it.

    The bad thing is high school boys are not the cleanest individuals.

    If you want more information on the protection program mentioned in a reply above you can go to the following link: http://usawct.org/

    Also as I have said before here my boys shower before and after ever meet and use a product called Defense Soap. I decided on this product because it is all natural and from the concept, I don't believe it is causing diseases like MRSA to become an even worse problem than they already are. It concerns me that all over the world these have been consistently getting more dangerous in just the past 15-25 years for no apparent reason. One idea is that the the large increase in use of antibacterial products is the problem.
    I'm not sure either way on this issue because I am not a doctor or a scientist. I can only do what I think is best, and the use of an all natural product is what I chose to do.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    For more info Google MRSA USA Wrestling, they have developed a complete protection plan. If your coach hasn't provided education, print that doc and hand it to him.
    Thanks for that RYou - I will do this and give a copy to the coach. Where he is new to our team, I don't know how seriously he takes this stuff so it couldn't hurt to show him.

    It concerns me that all over the world these have been consistently getting more dangerous in just the past 15-25 years for no apparent reason. One idea is that the the large increase in use of antibacterial products is the problem.
    We were just talking about this in science class the other day, TycoonSlam. My biology teacher was saying that because the world had gone crazy for antibacterial products that the bugs were becoming resistant to them and developing "superbugs" that aren't affected by the antibacterial stuff. Does using an all natural alternative not affect the germs like that then?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    Everyone should be careful. Two athletes in our room had it last year. The most important thing is to be educated. Know what to look for early and get treated right away. One wrestler was treated early and cleared up in 10 days with oral antibiotics...the other wrestler wasnt treated right away and was hospitalized and had to be treated with several IV antibiotics before they found one to work.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Is MRSA a risk in the high school arena?

    Quote Originally Posted by rich1990 View Post
    Thanks for that RYou - I will do this and give a copy to the coach. Where he is new to our team, I don't know how seriously he takes this stuff so it couldn't hurt to show him.



    We were just talking about this in science class the other day, TycoonSlam. My biology teacher was saying that because the world had gone crazy for antibacterial products that the bugs were becoming resistant to them and developing "superbugs" that aren't affected by the antibacterial stuff. Does using an all natural alternative not affect the germs like that then?

    There is no easy answer to this question Rich. The short and unsatisfying answer is, yes and no. Some germs do become resistant to natural compounds, while others do not. Add in the factor of random mutation caused by various environment stresses and it even gets more confusing.

    From the research I have done, natural compounds usually have as much of a chance of creating resistance strains like artificial compounds do. Maybe this is because of their limited use due to not being able to patent and thus create a exclusive commercial market on them.

    Allow me to give you an example. Many people use antibacterial underarm deodorant. From my experience after using a product like this for a couple of months, it begins to loose its effectiveness, I have to assume it is because of resistant bacteria that cause odor thrive and grow where the others have died off. However if I use something like lemon juice, where the citric acid kills virtually all of the bacteria that cause underarm odor, it works the same every time. Citric acid is something those bacteria can't seem to develop a resistance to an d yet by its nature is an antibacterial product even if it is not officially seen as one.

    Using another example, Defense Soap, the soap I encourage my boys to use, it has many of these natural compounds that have been shown to have antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal properties, and so far as far as I know the germs have not shown a tendency to become resistant to them and they are not known to be harmful to the environment at this point.

    Does this begin to show you just how complicated of a question you asked and how complicated the answer really is?

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