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Thread: Estonian and Nazi Glorification

  1. #1

    Default Estonian and Nazi Glorification

    Estonia has taken it's nazi glorification to new heights. These are some of the books that are now published in estonia. http://rus.delfi.ee/projects/picalbu...hp?id=16015510
    http://pilt.delfi.ee/ru/album/21950/

    One book is called Adolf Hitler: the Liberator and what if Hitler liberated Russia.
    Also, the Estonian government allows ss veterans who fought for the nazis to march and have open parades. All these actions are approved by the estonian governemnt and encouraged. The book about Hitler is also being taught in school and young estonians learn to hate russians and glorify Hitler at a young age. Yet, somehow estonia is part of the EU and is supported by the west. Could it be because they border Russia?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Estonian and Nazi Glorification

    Am I missing something, or are these things (books, parades, nazi glorification) not also allowed in the U.S.?

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    Default Re: Estonian and Nazi Glorification

    Do they also teach this in Estonia?

    Holocaust in Estonia 1941 - 1944
    Estonia had a Jewish population of 4,500 people before the war. In Lithuania in particular, and Latvia and Estonia to some extent, there was an already existing foundation of anti-Semitism.[1] The German Nazis were able to use these feelings in certain segments of the local population to incite them into collaboration with their anti-Jewish policies. One of the significant aspects of The Holocaust in the Baltics is the fact that the Germans were able to solicit executioners from the local population. Prior to the German invasion of Russia, Jews in other German occupied countries were being ghettoized and murdered, but not to the extent and with the swiftness that happened in the Baltic countries [1].


    Map titled "Jewish Executions Carried Out by Einsatzgruppe A" from the December 1941 Jager Report by the commander of a Nazi death squad. Marked "Secret Reich Matter," the map shows the number of Jews shot in Ostland, and reads at the bottom: "the estimated number of Jews still on hand is 128,000". Estonia is marked as judenfrei.Round-ups and killings of Jews began immediately following the arrival of the first German troops in 1941, who were closely followed by the extermination squad Einsatzkommando (Sonderkommando) 1A, part of Einsatzgruppe A. Arrests and executions continued as the Germans, with the assistance of local collaborators, advanced through Estonia. About 75% of Estonia's Jewish community, aware of the fate that otherwise awaited them, managed to escape to the Soviet Union; [1] virtually all the remainder (between 950 and 1000 men, women and children) were killed before the end of 1941. Fewer than a dozen Estonian Jews are known to have survived the war in Estonia. The Nazi regime also established 22 concentration and labor camps in Estonia for foreign Jews, the largest, Vaivara, had 20,000 Jewish prisoners pass through its gates, and several thousand foreign Jews were killed at the Kalevi-Liiva camp. [2]


    [edit] Estonian military units' involvement in crimes against humanity
    An International Commission for the Investigation of Crimes Against Humanity [2] has reviewed the role of Estonian military units and police battalions in an effort to identify the role of Estonian military units and police battalions participation during the World War II in following actions: escorting Jews deported from Vilnius to camps in Estonia; providing guards for the Vaivara camp complex, the camps at Tartu, Jägala, Tallinn, and camps for Soviet POWs, in all of which prisoners were killed; guarding the transit camp for Jews at Izbica in Poland, where a significant number of Jews were killed; providing guards to prevent the escape of Jews being rounded up in several towns in Poland, including Lodz, Przemysl, Rzeszow, and Tarnopol; and the roundup and mass shooting of the Jewish population of at least one town in Belarus (Novogrudok). Conclusions of the Estonian International Commission for the Investigation of Crimes Against Humanity.[2]


    20th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Estonian)
    The Estonian Legion of Waffen-SS was formed on the order of Adolf Hitler in 1942 and since January 1944 is more known as the 20-th Division SS.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occupat...ia_1941_-_1944

    Many of those Estonians were filthy pigs and killers and deserved every bit of their so-called suffering.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Estonian and Nazi Glorification

    Quote Originally Posted by matclone View Post
    Am I missing something, or are these things (books, parades, nazi glorification) not also allowed in the U.S.?
    Is teaching it to young kids in school allowed in the U.S.?

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    Default Re: Estonian and Nazi Glorification

    Is teaching it to young kids in school allowed in the U.S.?

    Depends on what you mean by "it". If you mean hatred of another country or people, in theory it's allowed, but in practice probably isn't done (not since whatever the last war was anyway). Of course today, as soon as a child is old enough to be interested in talk radio, and listens, he'll get many lessons in what it means to hate.

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