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Thread: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

  1. #1
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    Default Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    Omar says his father is very sorry for 9/11 but he feels he needed to do it in order to save millions in the future even if thousands died on 9/11. Apparently, Omar wants Bush and Osama Bin Laden to meet and discuss how to make Peace.

    The video is on yahoo's front page. All Osama Bin Laden wants is Peace, just like Bush!

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    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    An interesting thing mentioned in the video is that Omar was with his father in Afghanistan until 2000. That means Omar must have known of 9/11 attacks being planned. Wouldn't that make him culpable since he knew and did not inform the Americans?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    I read this on CNN yesterday. http://www.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/meast/...ref=newssearch


    Bin Laden's son to father: Change your ways

    CAIRO, Egypt (CNN) -- Omar bin Laden has a message for his father, Osama: "Find another way."

    Omar bin Laden says he last saw his father in 2000 when the son decided to leave al Qaeda.

    The son of the most-wanted man in the world spoke Sunday to CNN in a quiet, middle-class suburb about an hour outside Cairo, Egypt.

    Omar bin Laden, who works as a contractor, said he is talking publicly because he wants an end to the violence his father has inspired -- violence that has killed innocent civilians in a spate of attacks around the world, including those of September 11, 2001.

    "I try and say to my father: 'Try to find another way to help or find your goal. This bomb, this weapons, it's not good to use it for anybody,' " he said in English learned in recent months from his British wife.

    He said that's not just his own message, but one that a friend of his father's and other Muslims have expressed to him. "They too say ... my father should change [his] way," he said.

    He said he hasn't spoken to his father since 2000, when he walked away from an al Qaeda training camp in Afghanistan with his father's blessings. He said he has no idea where his father is, but is confident he will never be caught because locals support him.

    Asked if his father might be living along the Afghan-Pakistan border, he said, "Maybe, maybe not."

    "Either way, the people there are different," he said. "They don't care about the government."

    Now, he and his wife are preparing to launch a movement far different from the one his father, Osama bin Laden, launched. They are pursuing a movement for peace.

    At first glance, Omar bin Laden appears to have little in common with the man who has eluded international efforts to find him. The 26-year-old's hair is bound in neat braids, he drives a Jeep and is married to a British national twice his age.

    But the physical resemblance quickly sinks in, even without the long beard his father favors. It is a resemblance he doesn't avoid. "Being Osama's son, I don't hide it. I don't hide my name," he said.

    "I am proud by my name, but if you have a name like mine you will find people run away from you, are afraid of you."

    He said he doesn't consider his father to be a terrorist. When his father was fighting the Soviets, Washington considered him a hero, he said.

    "Before they call it war; now they call it terrorism," he said. He said his father believes his duty is to protect Muslims from attack.

    "He believes this is his job -- to help the people," he said. "I don't think my father is a terrorist because history tells you he's not."

    However, Omar bin Laden -- who was 14 when he began training in al Qaeda camps -- said he differs greatly with his father over the killing of civilians.

    Was 9/11 a just attack?

    "I don't think 9/11 was right personally, but it happened," he said. "I don't think ... [the war] in Vietnam was right. I don't think what's going on in Palestine is right. I don't think what's going on in Iraq is right.

    "If we make what is right and not right, we will make a very big list," he said.

    He said he left al Qaeda because he did not want to be associated with killing civilians. He said his father did not try to dissuade him from leaving al Qaeda.

    "I told him I was going, and wanted to try life and see what it was like outside because, from a young age I was with my father, and I only saw and heard my father and his friends. My father told me, 'If this is what your choice -- your decision -- is, what can I tell you? I like you to be with me, but this is your decision.' "

    So father and son went their separate ways.

    But there has been no running from the bin Laden name, not after the events of September 11. On that day, Omar bin Laden was in Saudi Arabia, where 15 of the 19 hijackers were from.

    Asked if, upon learning of the news, he knew his father had been behind it, he replied, "Yeah, maybe."

    He said he felt sadness for those killed. "I don't think 9/11 was right personally," he said. "I don't agree with 9/11 or with any war where only civilians are dying."

    Asked why he did not protest more strongly his father's role in the killing of civilians, he said it is up to the religious clerics close to his father to tell Osama bin Laden to change tactics in the name of Islam.

    And even if that most unlikely scenario were to occur, he said, al Qaeda would not stop. "My father doesn't have the power to stop the movement at this moment."

    Sitting by his side throughout the hour-and-a-half interview was his wife, Zaina. The two are organizing a multi-month horserace through North Africa in the name of peace, set to kick off this year.

    But getting sponsors to line up behind the name bin Laden has been difficult. "It would probably have been easier to do a race without having Omar's name, but then the race would just be a race, it wouldn't be a race for peace," his wife said.

    Omar bin Laden said his relationship with his father was limited. He is the fourth of 11 children born to his father's first wife, and he is one of 19 children Osama bin Laden has fathered. "Most of the time he busy, so busy, all the day he's busy [with] his friends. He was working a lot."
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    Omar bin Laden is now undertaking perhaps an impossible task: trying to rebrand the name they share.

    But he said he is not looking for approval from his father. "My life, I take care of my life," he said. "My father he take care of his life."
    "All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind." -- Abraham Lincoln

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    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    Well Bonnie, give us your opinion on the matter please.

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    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    He said he doesn't consider his father to be a terrorist. When his father was fighting the Soviets, Washington considered him a hero, he said.

    "Before they call it war; now they call it terrorism," he said.
    He said his father believes his duty is to protect Muslims from attack.

    "He believes this is his job -- to help the people," he said. "I don't think my father is a terrorist because history tells you he's not."


    That is the irony. Americans don't feel bad that 15,000 Soviet soldiers were killed in Afghanistan. Bin Laden was a hero then.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    Ha! They were the "enemy". Like Bin Laden said, it's all in the spin - if you are on the US's side you are a "hero" or a "soldier", if you are against us you are a "terrorist". Too much spin.
    "All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind." -- Abraham Lincoln

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    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    Americans don't feel bad that 15,000 Soviet soldiers were killed in Afghanistan

    The people who were going to work in the Twin Towers weren't soldiers. They were people going to work, just like all of us.

    Do you feel bad for the people who were murdered that day? Or did they somehow deserve it, being that they were all capitalist tools supporting an evil Republican regime.

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    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    Quote Originally Posted by Flop The Nuts View Post
    Americans don't feel bad that 15,000 Soviet soldiers were killed in Afghanistan

    The people who were going to work in the Twin Towers weren't soldiers. They were people going to work, just like all of us.

    Do you feel bad for the people who were murdered that day? Or did they somehow deserve it, being that they were all capitalist tools supporting an evil Republican regime.
    First Bin Laden and friends blew up Afghan government and supporters as well who were civilians. Soviet Army was sent to help the government deal with it.

    Second, it was a draft in Soviet Union. It was a universal draft where every boy at 18 years of age had to join the military for two years. These were future college students, someone's sons, brothers, and even husbands.

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    Default Re: Osama Bin Laden is a good man--his son Omar says

    I saw the movie Two Women (Italian; 1960) again the other night. Besides revealing that Sophia Loren was one of the most beautiful women ever, it really shows the pernicious effect of war on ordinary people, as innocent people are displaced, their homes are disrupted, and sometimes they are killed. In America, we think of Italians as being ordinary people (although it hasn't always been that way here). But with Muslims or Afghans or Russians, we're conditioned to see them as our enemy. They are not ordinary people. They are just bad people.

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