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Thread: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

  1. #19
    Olympic Champ RYou's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    I am most distrustful of cops with and without radar.

    Got pulled over for 42 in a 35. Now I knew I was a tad over 35 but not over 40 so I went to court to defend it. I was probably the 8th person to go before the judge. 6 others ahead of me were all there over the same cop, the same day, the same speeding ticket - every single one was for 42 on the same section of 35 mph. Judge hammered everyone ahead of me. I get up there and question the cop about his training, calibration of the radar and then I hit him with the 7 tickets at 42 question. I asked him how many other days he's experienced with no deviation in the speed result. "Happens quite often". I asked him about resetting the the device. He says it doesn't have to be reset, it's self resetting. I asked him how he documents a specific car, does it print a receipt, some evidence of the speed. "No". Judge cuts me off. "Son you're boring this court. I find you guilty as charged, that'll be $65 and $135 court costs, pay the clerk." But Judge..... "Son say another word and I'll fine you $200 for contempt of court".

    Second go round, cop walks up "I have you doing 38 in a 30 mph zone". But officer, look I've got a digital speedometer. It read 33 when you pulled me over. He looks down. "Okay, but you weren't wearing your seat belt when you passed me. That'll cost you $40 and 0 points."
    Of course I was wearing the seat belt.

    I paid the ticket.
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  2. #20

    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    My town now has white vans parked in places throughout the city that have UNMANNED RADARS. These things apparantly clock every car that goes by it. It, somehow, sends tickets to speeders. The speeders are known who they are because of a license plate.

    Dude called into a radio station this morning and said he had recieved a speeding ticket from one of these. There was a motorcycle going the opposite direction in the picture that was sent to him. The catch is, the motorcycle didn't have a license plate. So, how does anyone know who was clocked? I think the dude has a good case and he said he would fight it. Win or lose, do we really want this type of crap?

  3. #21
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    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by quinn14 View Post
    So you are ok with a cop just "guesstimating" your speed, even thought they have the technology to get it right. But you don't like them to be able to "guesstimate" whether a person is a legal citizen or not.

    Am I getting it right? Are you being hypocritical? Please tell me why a cop is okay guessing in one situation but not the other.
    Sorry, not in the mood for snarky - you'll have to play with somebody else.
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  4. #22

    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by sgallan View Post
    Sorry, not in the mood for snarky - you'll have to play with somebody else.
    Well, I tried.

  5. #23

    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    Other, non-radar, means of determining speed is often by pace, which for the record is matching the speed of the target vehicle a car length away or so and 'eyeballing' that the gap between the target and the patrol car is not changing. The pace needs to be a reasonable distance which the court will decide but usually 100 yards or more is sufficient. There is/was no requirement to videotape the distance nor were any device needed to determine the distance between vehicles necessary. The court would accept my visual estimation.

    I understand the dislike of an officer's visual estimation of speed being the sole evidence necessary to convict, but worries of how it will be abused is exaggerated. The courts in California could always accept it as long as you can convince the court, under the specific circumstances of the case, that the officer has the ability to do so. In the very, very few cases that I witnessed a visual estimation was accepted in court the estimation was for a speed well in excess of the posted safe speed or the maximum speed limit on a highway.

    In one case the visual estimation was for a motorist cited for exceeding the max limit on Highway 101 (65 mph) for driving an estimated 85 +. In court the officer said he was on patrol driving at 55 mph when the motorist passed him at a high rate of speed. Because the offense is complete at 65 mph the court found him guilty and assigned a fine equivalent to traveling 10 mph over the limit. Now is that an outrageous decision or misuse of the CHP's judgement? It's reasonable.

    Another example is mine personally. It was about 10 pm and I was approaching to stop at a red light in the City. A Porsche was stopped ahead of me in the left turn pocket as I rolling up behind him. The Porsche driver apparently didn't see me and when the light cycled giving him a green left arrow he lit up his tires and took off like a bat out of hell. He made the left turn but the weight transfer of his car made him slide from the #1 lane into the #2 lane almost colliding with a car legally in its position. The second car was forced up onto the curb. I estimated the Porsche's speed was now in excess of 40 mph in 25 mph zone. I chased after him with my supercharged Dodge Diplomat (lol) and he accelerated above 50 mph. I lit up my lights and called in a failure to yield. By this time I believe he saw me and took many left and rights through a residential neighborhood accelerating in excess of 40 mph after every turn. He took one turn too fast and skidded so I was able to close the gap enough that he stopped. I did not have enough evidence to testify he was evading because I feel he could claim in court he was just hot rodding and never truly knew I was there. While I have no doubt he was evading me I would have testified honestly that its possible he didn't know. The driver was actually a neurosurgeon at SF General (I think). I cited him of reckless and exhibition of speed.

    The neurosurgeon driver contested the cite and we both gave testimony in court. The judge was known as a hard a$$ on both drivers and the cops. He was an equal opportunity a$$ chewer. Anyway the neurosurgeon had a semi-smart a$$ answer to one of the judge's questions. Based on my training and experience and the observations of driving, the judge ruled that my visual estimate of speed and other driving behaviors was sufficient to find the driver guilty of reckless driving and dismissed the exhibition of speed. The neurosurgeon let out a sarcastic sigh and the judge unloaded on him. He told the neurosurgeon that the maximum penalty for reckless (a misdemeanor) was six months in jail and $1000 fine and THAT was the sentence he imposed. Then the judge sarcastically sighed back asking, "Now what do you think of that?" The doctor stood stunned and said, "I'm...I'm overwhelmed." The judge chewed him a bit then suspended the sentence and told him that if he had one driving violation in the next six months he would reinstate the sentence. Now I think that's another applicable use of judgement and estimation of speed being accepted by the court.

    RYou, digital or otherwise, unless the speedometer has been calibrated by an accepted facility or lab its reading holds little to no weight in court, at least in California that is.

    Quinn14, while I accept it is legal for radar/camera cites being mailed to motorists, I frigging hate that idea both when I was working the street and now that I'm retired. I feel it's bad for the community and harms the relationship between the public and the law enforcement agency.

  6. #24

    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by pm01 View Post

    Quinn14, while I accept it is legal for radar/camera cites being mailed to motorists, I frigging hate that idea both when I was working the street and now that I'm retired. I feel it's bad for the community and harms the relationship between the public and the law enforcement agency.
    I agree. It makes people not like the police. And it is all just a money grab.

  7. #25

    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    PM01 - When did police begin using radar? It seems to me my first dozen or so speeding tickets were all based on the officer's (usually conservative) judgement of the speed I was travelling. Of course, chariots didn't move the way cars do today . . . .

    Actually, I hate the idea of "speed cameras" too. Since I learned how to act when an officer approaches my car, and my hair grayed out, I have gotten one ticket - and that was for Driving While Californicating in Oregon. I don't think I can convince a camera to let me go with a warning.

    R.I.P. Cyrano and Roxanne.

  8. #26
    Ancient Arachnid Spider's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by M Richardson View Post
    Since I learned how to act when an officer approaches my car . . .
    Please share.
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  9. #27

    Default Re: Ohio Cops No Longer Need Radar to Give Speeding Tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by Spider View Post
    Please share.
    $pider, I'd be happy to pa$$ along a few $ugge$$tion$ if nece$$ary.

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