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Thread: Training concept in Russia

  1. #1

    Default Training concept in Russia

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    Last edited by mkrohlas; 04-09-2008 at 09:08 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    Coaches! Every good wrestling club in Russia has World class technicians that emphasize technique above all. Wrestling is like science in Russia, every move has a purpose to do something very efficiently. In America you often have very low level wrestlers, if that, teaching kids how to wrestle. I don't know much about Western Europe though.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    A typical session in Russia would consist of some warmup running and gymnastics or playing soccer or rugby for 20 minutes. Then, you have lots of drilling and strategy work. Then live wrestling and situations. Then some conditioning.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    I have noticed in watching (MMA my gig) that russian, Cuban and other competitors are more willing to coldly strategize their opponents and adapt. Brazilians and Americans are very emotional fighters and I think that interferes on occasion with strategy. Look at Randy Couture; he is 44 turning 45 and he jsut beat Gabriel Nap?o and Tim SYlvia. He did so because even being older than a 30 something fighter he is able to bring a very cool head and use that.

    The wrestling I have seen is similiar. Athletes from Russia,Cuba and countries that are somewhat cold-blooded seem to me, as a sweeping generalization, produce athletes who simply detach and execute techniques. I think more emotonal fighters get flustered, angry, commit mental errors etc.....

    I think the American training techniques have adopted a lot of the Russian methodology; Olympic supporting lifts, partner bodyweight carries, kettlebells........

    A good example to me is someone like Emilianenko Fedor (sory for the constant MMA references) who enters the ring and looks like he could fall asleep at any time. Look at Minotauro, who enters pumped up and cries tears of joy when he wins; Minotauro is less able to make an objective decision in the heat of combat and be it wrestling, judo, karate, I think that is a factor. Opinions?????????

  5. #5

    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    Quote Originally Posted by dmaswary View Post
    I have noticed in watching (MMA my gig) that russian, Cuban and other competitors are more willing to coldly strategize their opponents and adapt. Brazilians and Americans are very emotional fighters and I think that interferes on occasion with strategy. Look at Randy Couture; he is 44 turning 45 and he jsut beat Gabriel Nap?o and Tim SYlvia. He did so because even being older than a 30 something fighter he is able to bring a very cool head and use that.

    The wrestling I have seen is similiar. Athletes from Russia,Cuba and countries that are somewhat cold-blooded seem to me, as a sweeping generalization, produce athletes who simply detach and execute techniques. I think more emotonal fighters get flustered, angry, commit mental errors etc.....

    I think the American training techniques have adopted a lot of the Russian methodology; Olympic supporting lifts, partner bodyweight carries, kettlebells........

    A good example to me is someone like Emilianenko Fedor (sory for the constant MMA references) who enters the ring and looks like he could fall asleep at any time. Look at Minotauro, who enters pumped up and cries tears of joy when he wins; Minotauro is less able to make an objective decision in the heat of combat and be it wrestling, judo, karate, I think that is a factor. Opinions?????????

    Hmm this is all theory bro, I dont know about all this.

    Look at john smith, he was pretty pumped up and agressive 2 or your dan gable, was a hard worker and won.
    Its not like wrestling is rocket science etc. Some fierceness is good.
    Thats what I like about the murtazaliev and saitiev bouts.

    We can make it very strategic etc but to my opinion murtazaliev is a short physical wrestler who just explodes or reacts very fast and saitiev is the tie up, the handy man, still he loses from murtazaliev.
    So the non thinking wrestler can also be very good, its not a chess game all the way.
    hate to say it again but think about slay and saitiev, now i know slay doesnt know as many techniques and situations to handle as saitiev, but he knows about blasting a double legged take down and he also knows like murtazaliev that even though they are both stronger than saitiev they should be clinching with him or not too long, thats all you need to know and just wait be patience...

  6. #6

    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    No, it is just a theory. I have a lot of them but Im not a "pure" wrestler to say. I could tell you what makes Brazilians better at BJJ versus Americans on average, but its not really relevent here.

    I remember watching the Pan Americans down here in Brazil and the cuban wrestler just seemed so removed, I think their mental game is spot on

    Having said that, I cannot for the life of me understand why America isn't considered one of the top wrestling nations. At least thats what it seems like here. Maybe we dont win as many Olympic medals but I think the quality is as good as anywhere on earth. Im just pontificating really because I think the Russians ability to organize an Olympc program, and the emphasis they put on it, maybe higher; having said that talent-wise, and knowledge wise Idont see anything in the US that isnt as good as anywhere else in wrestling.

    Im jsut trying to rationalize the boards opinion; IMO - Cael Sanderson, Dan Gable and all the other greats are as good as anyone the russians have.


    The Cubans I saw in the Pan Am qualifiers here i Brazil seemed to me, more than anything else, more willing to strictly follow a tight strategy; they didnt seem superior in any other way and iMO that was just one tournament that they performed particularly well in.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    Don't let the people on here fool you dmaswary. There is a definite anti-American bias here on the inernational board. The United States is one of the top wrestling nations. I am not saying it is the best wrestling nation, but consistently one of the best. Obviously Russia is the gold standard in freestyle wrestling, but they have not won every world title. The United States and other nations breakthrough from time to time. It was not to long ago that a russian republic upstaged mighty russia (Georgia). I know I am showing my American bias as well, but somebody has to stand up for the USA as well. We are definitely not second rate. There is a degree of jealousy in the rest of the world towards the things we have, are capable of doing, and our successes. The funny thing is that most of the people on here talking about how great russia and other nations are, live in this country. I do not see any of them going back to these places to live. Just my 2 cents, and I do know a little about international wrestling. I am not a senior world or olypic medalist or anything, but I have won a junior world freestlye championship and a cadet world greco roman championship way back in the dark ages.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    Quote Originally Posted by dmaswary View Post
    I have noticed in watching (MMA my gig) that russian, Cuban and other competitors are more willing to coldly strategize their opponents and adapt. Brazilians and Americans are very emotional fighters and I think that interferes on occasion with strategy. Look at Randy Couture; he is 44 turning 45 and he jsut beat Gabriel Nap?o and Tim SYlvia. He did so because even being older than a 30 something fighter he is able to bring a very cool head and use that.

    The wrestling I have seen is similiar. Athletes from Russia,Cuba and countries that are somewhat cold-blooded seem to me, as a sweeping generalization, produce athletes who simply detach and execute techniques. I think more emotonal fighters get flustered, angry, commit mental errors etc.....

    I think the American training techniques have adopted a lot of the Russian methodology; Olympic supporting lifts, partner bodyweight carries, kettlebells........

    A good example to me is someone like Emilianenko Fedor (sory for the constant MMA references) who enters the ring and looks like he could fall asleep at any time. Look at Minotauro, who enters pumped up and cries tears of joy when he wins; Minotauro is less able to make an objective decision in the heat of combat and be it wrestling, judo, karate, I think that is a factor. Opinions?????????
    I agree, when I see a calm, cool and detatched athlete about to fight, I think winner. Some wired guy jumping out of his skin makes me think he's unsure, why else psych yourself up like that? You're scared. Stone face, cold heart as the karate guys say.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Training concept in Russia

    .

    In my own personal experience I did great, never lost when I didnt care. The second I decided to become a professional my performance suffered because I started to be too hard on myself. I had a sort of spiritual/religious experience a few months back and Im back to my old self.

    The mental game is everything to me.

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