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Thread: Freestyle wrestler Folkstyl(ing)

  1. #1

    Default Freestyle wrestler Folkstyl(ing)

    I have a curious question for our American friends.

    Over the years, I have been a part of some travelling Canadian teams that have competed in the States- usually in the Freestyle (off-season) tournaments. However, we have trained with American teams in Folkstyle and have even competed in a few Folkstyle tournaments and have done quite well, despite the rule differences.

    So we always discuss the difficulty of American college studs trying to make the Olympic transition. But I've been wondering how hard it would be for a Freestyle wrestler to make the transition to Folkstyle. I have an athlete who is a decent Canadian Freestyle wrestler who may have to follow his family to the States. What are his chances of sucess in terms of making his High School team and adjusting to the rules. It seems, to me, that a good freestyle wrestler can easily take advantage of the 'funk' of the folkstyle wrestlers and put them to their back.

    Comments?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Freestyle wrestler Folkstyl(ing)

    I think that the transition is easier (free to folk). The only things he'll struggle with (we have a foreign exchange student wrestling for us so I'm using him as a very small statistical sample) are locking hands, using the whole mat, and nearfall/exposure.
    Quote Originally Posted by Flop The Nuts View Post
    [D]on't let lack of knowledge impact your ability to post as if you are knowledgeable.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Freestyle wrestler Folkstyl(ing)

    A freestyle wrestler doesn't work on getting off the mat once he gets taken down. This could create huge problems if he wrestles someone who is good on top. Someone like a David Taylor, for example.

    The takedowns are pretty similar, but a freestyler would have to remember that just throwing someone on their back without control doesn't score points and could result in getting taken down themselves. That is the type of situation where a Ben Askren type scrambler would have an advantage.

    I really don't know which transition would be easier, since I haven't tried either way. Both have pros and cons which can be exploited by someone who is really good at their natural style. But, if your athlete moves to the states and trains only in folkstyle, he should be able to make the transition. Just make sure he knows that flattening out on the bottom will only get stalling calls against him. He has to try to get up. Trying to get up also could lead into pinning combinations that he may not be used to. I am not sure how comfortable a freestyler would be trying to stand up.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Freestyle wrestler Folkstyl(ing)

    I wrestled folkstyle once, with a day's preperation. Our team's biggest complaint (and mine personally) was "wrestling on bottom sucks". Also, one of my team mates had this to say "I tried an arm throw and when I missed I realised that not only did I just give the other guy points, but now I'm stuck on bottom too!"

    The SFU wrestling teams do quite a bit of folkstyle, despite growing up as freestyle wrestlers. Their sucess varies. Some guys won NAIA championships. Others struggle- for example Danny Einhorn, who beat Farniev in freestyle bud didn't do so well at fokstyle.

    For what it's worth, my coach once told me that freestyle-folkstyle is a harder transition than folkstyle-freestyle. I can't remember why.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Freestyle wrestler Folkstyl(ing)

    I just saw this blog on flowrestling.org. The dude who wrote it is the brother of Ben Askren, who I mentioned above and also an NCAA champion.

    http://techniquewave.flowrestling.or...estyle-why-not

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