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Thread: Cornell

  1. #19

    Default Re: Cornell

    Cornell had backups already going in 3-4 weight classes. Unlike a massive state school with lower entry requirements, they do not have an endless supply of state champs, shady transfers and all americans to throw out there. Take a look at their roster and tell me who should have wrestled and how that would be beneficial to the match. Penn State has a nice top 7 team this year so I am not knocking them. Again - the cornell team has so many injuries due to the open tourney sched. Do you even know if they have a backup at 149 at this pt?

  2. #20
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    Default Re: Cornell

    Quote Originally Posted by HatchetJack View Post
    Cornell had backups already going in 3-4 weight classes. Unlike a massive state school with lower entry requirements, they do not have an endless supply of state champs, shady transfers and all americans to throw out there. Take a look at their roster and tell me who should have wrestled and how that would be beneficial to the match. Penn State has a nice top 7 team this year so I am not knocking them. Again - the cornell team has so many injuries due to the open tourney sched. Do you even know if they have a backup at 149 at this pt?
    Frankly, the exclusivity works to attract major talent, not keep it away, in a sport with no lucrative professional future such as wrestling, squash, or fencing. Ordinary Division 1 state schools now get 9.9 athletic scholarships per 10 weight team, and those are often split up over many people. That is hardly an endless supply, and minor compared to the abundant need-based financial aid offered by some of the most exclusive, well-endowed private schools, but perhaps not by Cornell. (Need is a relative thing.) The Ivies have no problem attracting wrestling talent of the highest caliber, including many state champs and High School All Americans.

  3. #21

    Default Re: Cornell

    Quote Originally Posted by grapplefan View Post
    Frankly, the exclusivity works to attract major talent, not keep it away, in a sport with no lucrative professional future such as wrestling, squash, or fencing. Ordinary Division 1 state schools now get 9.9 athletic scholarships per 10 weight team, and those are often split up over many people. That is hardly an endless supply, and minor compared to the abundant need-based financial aid offered by some of the most exclusive, well-endowed private schools, but perhaps not by Cornell. (Need is a relative thing.) The Ivies have no problem attracting wrestling talent of the highest caliber, including many state champs and High School All Americans.
    Attracting them is one thing; getting them in the school is quite another. Harvard, for example, has two admission spots a year. TWO. Over four years, that doesn't even make an entire line-up. So, you either have to be at Harvard's academic standards (they accepted nine per cent of the people who applied there last year) or be one of the lucky two who is offered an admission spot. Even if you're given that admission spot, you still have to be able to hack it at Harvard, and if your family makes more than $60,000 a year, you're not seeing that "abundant need-based financial aid."

  4. #22

    Default Re: Cornell

    Not necessarily anymore...Harvard has some good news

    On Monday, Harvard University brought good news to its 763 students who receive financial aid and whose families earn between $120,000 and $180,000 annually as well as thousands more prospective undergrads: Harvard is now affordable.

    (See also: Get Educated or Die)


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    Here's the deal. Starting with the next school year, Harvard will charge 10 percent of household income for tuition for students from families earning between $120,000 and $180,000 a year. So if your family earns $120,000 a year, you would pay $12,000 a year in tuition, not the $45,600 normal charge.



    Harvard also will give grants--not loans--in financial-aid packages and won't factor in equity in a house when figuring out how much aid a family gets. The reason for this unprecedented move is Harvard no longer wants families to sell or borrow against their homes to make the prestigious university affordable for their children.



    Dubbed the "middle-income initiative," the university increased its initial pledge to help families earning between $60,000 and $80,000 after evaluating the pressure on the middle class. "We hear about this in a number of ways: housing costs, both parents working, the difficulty of amassing any kinds of savings, just the increasing pressures as middle-class lives have become more stressed," Harvard's President Drew Gilpin Faust, the university's first female president, told The New York Times.



    The new plan is the latest push by the university to make the school more affordable and to encourage students out of the elite and moneyed network to apply. Three years ago, under then President Lawrence H. Summers, the university announced families earning less than $40,000 would not have to pay tuition. It later upped the earning minimum to $80,000.
    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until they speak."

  5. #23

    Default Re: Cornell

    That's a fantastic thing, but it still won't help get more wrestlers in the door if they don't give Jay more admissions spots.

  6. #24

    Default Re: Cornell

    that may be true but there are few wrestlers out there who are academic first and wrestling second that could make significant contributions to a wrestling program while getting a world class education...its not easy but it happens...a program like this will help.

    think of guys like Troy Nickerson and Eric Tannenbaum. these guys exist they are just a little bit tougher to find.
    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until they speak."

  7. #25

    Default Re: Cornell

    Believe it or not the Carlson School of Business at the U of Minnesota is a great recruiting tool for scholar/athletes.
    "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until they speak."

  8. #26
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    Default Re: Cornell

    Quote Originally Posted by bluestater View Post
    Attracting them is one thing; getting them in the school is quite another. Harvard, for example, has two admission spots a year. TWO. Over four years, that doesn't even make an entire line-up. So, you either have to be at Harvard's academic standards (they accepted nine per cent of the people who applied there last year) or be one of the lucky two who is offered an admission spot. Even if you're given that admission spot, you still have to be able to hack it at Harvard, and if your family makes more than $60,000 a year, you're not seeing that "abundant need-based financial aid."
    Goferphan is right, they changed it this year. Now all families making less than $180,000 are eligible for financial aid with NO college loans. The average Harvard student currently pays $4k to $5k per year. Other well-endowed schools are following suit. And academically, Harvard is a lot harder to get into than to stay in.
    Jay is great and he does a terrific job, and I'm a big fan. I wouldn't underestimate the "walk-on" talent at Harvard outside of the two spots either. They DO get wrestling talent that meets those academic standards. The people who Harvard accepts aren't just lucky, they're gifted. Jay will tell you that he gets guys who are motivated, smart, and self-disciplined. I can think of some other highly-regarded wrestling teams who could use a few of those.
    Last edited by grapplefan; 01-07-2008 at 09:24 AM.

  9. #27

    Default Re: Cornell

    Back to the orginial topic....

    Here's some injury updates as per Coach Koll's weekly release

    Injury Update
    DJ Meagher: He is permitted to practice this week. Doubtful for this weekend
    Adam Frey: Will start drilling this week. Probably for National Duals
    Jordan Leen: Will start drilling this week. Probably for National Duals
    Taylor Moore: Will start drilling this week. Doubtful for National Duals
    Josh Arnone: Has been medically released to compete. Expected to compete on Feb. 2
    He let himself down, for what...a woman. I say, go be a world champion let the women come to you......Tito Ortiz

    www.d1collegewrestling.net

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