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Thread: Caldwell's Spladle

  1. #1
    Herbert DEC Askren 5-4
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    Default Caldwell's Spladle

    I like how he sets it up. Inside trip leg in....and he has beaten the arm. He stands the guy up who is trying to maintain a base to avoid the takedown. After working the head a couple times. He reaches over and grabs the FOOT. Not at the knee....and almost past the ankle. There is no pulling your leg back from there.
    I wish I could kick Matt Dragon in the balls. In his Dragonballz.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    And equally important part of that is the way it turned it. Pulling with your hands isn't nearly as effective a rolling backwards using your hips.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    Quote Originally Posted by OGGoldy View Post
    And equally important part of that is the way it turned it. Pulling with your hands isn't nearly as effective a rolling backwards using your hips.
    Great point....which is why I laughed my a** off when the cries of Metcalf getting caught in a lucky move where thrown out pre-video viewing. This is a move he has perfected (to a degree) in the room and set it up beautifully.

    That said, I am not 100% sure it was a pin when the ref called it, but I am 100% sure that any ref that sticks there hands under the back to help judge a pin is considered Bush League!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    Totally!

    First, I think the success of that move had more to do with Metcalf not realizing he was in a vulnerable position, for about 20 seconds, than Caldwell's ability to hit a great spladel. Not to take anything away from
    Caldwell, he hit a great spladel, but it was with help from Metcalf.

    Now, that ref got really personal during the pin, don't 'cha think?
    He fairly climbed on board, and then stuck his hand under, and finally called the pin maybe right as Metcalf got his shoulder up.

    What a bizzar set of circumstances.

    As a photographer, I'm a Caldwell fan, the kid has un-human-like quickness.

    Tony

  5. #5
    Olympic Champ
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    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    Too bad it didn't get to 3rd period where Metcalf was hoping to wear him out.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    Is there a video somewhere?
    A straw man argument is an informal fallacy based on misrepresentation of an opponent's position. A straw man argument can be a successful rhetorical technique (that is, it may succeed in persuading people) but it carries little or no real evidential weight, because the opponent's actual argument has not been refuted.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    Quote Originally Posted by GopherfanbackinMN View Post
    Great point....which is why I laughed my a** off when the cries of Metcalf getting caught in a lucky move where thrown out pre-video viewing. This is a move he has perfected (to a degree) in the room and set it up beautifully.

    That said, I am not 100% sure it was a pin when the ref called it, but I am 100% sure that any ref that sticks there hands under the back to help judge a pin is considered Bush League!
    A spladle is a move that you can't really "perfect" it is just something you have to get used to, as every time you do it, you will be in a unique situation.

    As far as the pin goes, if you can't see under the wrestler's back, what do you do?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    Quote Originally Posted by mmiille View Post
    Is there a video somewhere?
    The video is posted on page 5 of the "Caldwell vs Metcalf" thread.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Caldwell's Spladle

    Quote Originally Posted by OGGoldy View Post
    The video is posted on page 5 of the "Caldwell vs Metcalf" thread.
    Thanks
    A straw man argument is an informal fallacy based on misrepresentation of an opponent's position. A straw man argument can be a successful rhetorical technique (that is, it may succeed in persuading people) but it carries little or no real evidential weight, because the opponent's actual argument has not been refuted.

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